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oil cloth
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vuduchicken
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed May 20, 2009 5:33 pm    Post subject: Oil Cloth Reply with quote

I've found the the fabric dept. at Walmart has some great stuff. I bought a few yards of 8 or 10oz canvas a while back. I don't remember exactly how much it cost, but I think it was about 2 or 3 dollars a yard (60 inches wide). A lot cheaper than buying a painters drop cloth. I have also found some pretty good looking tapistry fabric (the kind that a carpet bag would be made from), ticking material (with red, green or blue stripes) & osnaburg there as well.

I'm new here & mostly a confederate WBTS reenactor, so I'm not to sure about the osnaburg, tapistry or ticking, being period correct for the period y'all are reenacting, but I am sure that these materials were available in 1860.
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flintlock54
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Joined: 22 Jul 2009
Posts: 7

Real Name: kevin grohs

PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 3:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ya'll cheat, 14 years ago I found dry colors, and wow its good stuff, the red iron oxide I found would you believe, and a feed mill, they made dog food, and red iron oxide is an ingreadiant, who would guess, I found yellow iron oxide at a pait shop, sheriwn williams to be exact, any way the the old school works for me, be safe and have fun. flintlock
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A friend of the scotsman
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Joined: 19 Aug 2009
Posts: 28

Real Name: danny chappell

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hey guys what brand of deck stain do u think is best?
thanks

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tqoqwej
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Joined: 28 Sep 2008
Posts: 11
Location: gloucester ma.
Real Name: bruce atkins

PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 7:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i like the deck stain idea what color stain would anyone sugest for oilcloth of late 1600's to early 1700's
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Mon Oct 05, 2009 2:22 pm    Post subject: Stains & Paints. Reply with quote

Why not just purchase brown cloth? Tents appear to have been white, so if someone were using old tent cloth then it would be white. If lindseed oil is used you get a dirty yellow which is pretty good in the woods.
It is thought that tanning the canvas used for sail cloth helped prevent rotting, it has also been suggested that that is why cloth was brown. Frankly I can't see one brown being any better than any other brown within reason regardless of period.
The brown oil cloth I purchased looks good, I see no point in painting and staining.
Le Loup.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 1:05 am    Post subject: Brown canvas/oil cloth Reply with quote

The "Galway Hooker" fishing boats traditionally had brown sails.
[img][URL=http://img17.imageshack.us/i/galwayhookerbrownsails.jpg/][IMG]http://img17.imageshack.us/img17/5840/galwayhookerbrownsails.th.jpg[/IMG][/URL][/img]
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Capt John Black
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Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Posts: 23
Location: Windham, Ct
Real Name: Ron Black

PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I made oil cloth late this summer. I bought a tarp, some linseed oil, beeswax, and light brown pint. Mixed it all in a pot, boiled it, and rolled it on the tarp with a paint roller. It took over four weeks to dry. Its very heavy but it works great. I was told after the fact that if you mix in some Japan Dryer it will dry much quicker.

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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed Oct 28, 2009 7:31 pm    Post subject: oilcloth. Reply with quote

[b]I found that a light canvas works just fine as is without any waterproofing and far less weight.
Le Loup.[/b]
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 6:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'm not sure about "tanning" cloth. I have seen acidic pH applied to cotton canvas rot it pretty quickly. I don't know what the brown sailcloth was colored with. Linseed oil, boiled, often needs to be boiled some more with limestone to change the pH, but that process REEKS!

Driers like japan or thinning with turpentine will also sometimes accelerate the rotting process. Plain canvas works fine, IF you can get the weave tight enough. I boil my canvas and then dry it in a clothes drier to tighten the weave, and then paint it if that's what is wanted.

YOHS

LD

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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Thu Oct 29, 2009 5:15 pm    Post subject: Shelter. Reply with quote

[quote="Loyalist Dave"]Well I'm not sure about "tanning" cloth. I have seen acidic pH applied to cotton canvas rot it pretty quickly. I don't know what the brown sailcloth was colored with. Linseed oil, boiled, often needs to be boiled some more with limestone to change the pH, but that process REEKS!

Driers like japan or thinning with turpentine will also sometimes accelerate the rotting process. Plain canvas works fine, IF you can get the weave tight enough. I boil my canvas and then dry it in a clothes drier to tighten the weave, and then paint it if that's what is wanted.

YOHS

LD[/quote]

[b]Good post Dave, thanks for sharing.
Le Loup.[/b]
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm Sorry Captain John...,

I failed to note you mentioned beeswax. I think the drying process with japan or turpentine would be inhibited with beeswax added to the mixture, and the cloth would stay "tacky".

LD

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Capt John Black
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Joined: 18 Oct 2009
Posts: 23
Location: Windham, Ct
Real Name: Ron Black

PostPosted: Sat Oct 31, 2009 7:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loyalist Dave wrote:
I'm Sorry Captain John...,

I failed to note you mentioned beeswax. I think the drying process with japan or turpentine would be inhibited with beeswax added to the mixture, and the cloth would stay "tacky".

LD


I'm not sure, I didn't use Jap Dryer on mine, but I have talked to people who have and they say it worked and cut the dry time in half.

My oil cloth is not tacky at all, even with the beeswax. An there is no smell of chemicals. It actually came out quite well, I did have my doubts in the beginning.

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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
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Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Sun Nov 01, 2009 11:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well then I shall try beeswax the next time! There was stuff called cerecloth which was linen with beeswax applied. The process was one of rubbing the cloth with the wax, and then applying heat such as an iron to melt it into the cloth. It was most widely used as a shroud, and some folks think it was exclusively used for that, but it had other uses. For folks who think they might want to replicate cerecloth, you probably want to use an actual antique iron, or a hot brick, as a modern iron with holes for steam, even without a steam setting turned on, is a bear to remove wax from. OR..., get a new iron, and use the old one for the cloth.

LD

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WHITEWOLFDAKOTA
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Joined: 12 Jun 2010
Posts: 4
Location: Knoxville,Tennessee
Real Name: John Arthur Cooper

PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2010 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

flintlock54 wrote:
ya'll cheat, 14 years ago I found dry colors, and wow its good stuff, the red iron oxide I found would you believe, and a feed mill, they made dog food, and red iron oxide is an ingreadiant, who would guess, I found yellow iron oxide at a pait shop, sheriwn williams to be exact, any way the the old school works for me, be safe and have fun. flintlock



This is the MOST FUN way but for those going out soon here's the skinny:

Go to Home Depot. Grab a 12 oz. drop cloth (Walmart only has 10 oz.)of whatever size or better yet grab a friend and do two with splitting a large cloth in half. Buy a gallon of Valspar Oil Gloss porch and Floor in Brick Red. Also pick up gal. of Boiled Linseed Oil(you will only need half of that and put the other half on shelf to use for everything else in the world and make sure it's boiled for the evaporation process)and a quart of Olympic Maximum waterproof sealant(for it's parafin wax(it dries fine),UV protection and sunblock). Split the gal. of porch paint, add quart of Linseed Oil to each and split the quart of Olympic Maximum between the two. Throw the cloth over a fence post or hitch'n rail, put on some good music and start brushing it on. Let it sit overnight and then do the other side.KEEP IT OUTSIDE!DO NOT PUT INSIDE DUE TO POSSIBLE AUTO COMBUSTION UNTIL DRIED(evaporation process). In a couple of days it will be good to go and have a beautiful frontier color. Then grab a round riverrock and rub the H out of both sides to soften it up.SIMPLE!

PS. Therer are a hundred formulas, I've tried or compared a few but this is a tried and true way for a cloth that will outlast you probably and look good doing it.JMHO!

GOODLUCK AND MAKE IT FUN!

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WATCH YOYUR TOPKNOT!
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hhaworth
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Joined: 05 Aug 2012
Posts: 10

Real Name: howard haworth

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2012 4:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried this and my cloth is just about done. I used a canvas drop cloth I got from sherwin williams cut it to 8x8 and used it for the past year as my bedroll. I saw this article and looked all around for linseed oil based deck stain. I had a hard time finding it but finally found it at a local ace hardware. It is actually ace brand and they have a base stain which they ad color too to get your desired color. I went with "new pilgrim red" and it looks great. downside is it took little over a gallon to cover one side of my 8x8 tarp. I have yet to flip it and coat the otherside as it cost about 25 dollars a gallon. for now ive done one side looks great but i dont know when i can get the other side done. I used a roller and just rolled it on and for the most part is soaked through pretty well.
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