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Vineyards

 
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Patricia A. Proctor
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2010 4:21 pm    Post subject: Vineyards Reply with quote

My vineyard notes - These are the new varieties that Bill, Margaret, William, Austin and I are planting this week.

Pinot Noir, a red wine of the vitis vinifera species is chiefly associated with the Burgundy region of France, but its history may go as far back as the first century A.D., with the species being only one or two generations removed from wild grapes. Pinot Noir might be a risk for Morgan County since it can suffer from cold damage below 5 degrees Fahrenheit. Research indicates the Pinot Noir has been grown in North America since at least the 19th century.

Cabernet Sauvignon Wine Grape – a prominent Bordeaux wine that is relatively new, coming into being during the 17th century by a chance crossing. This grape grows as far north as Canada, so I’m hoping for success in Indiana.

Concord - our old American standby has done well on my grounds, full robust flavor

Zinfandel Wine Grapes – Genetically identical to the Croatian grape, Crljenak Kaštelanski. The arrival of Zinfandel in the United States may have been via the Imperial Nursery in Vienna, Austria, which likely obtained the vines during the Habsburg Monarchy's rule over Croatia, which was expanded when Austria acquired the Dalmatian territories of the former Republic of Venice in 1797. George Gibbs, a horticulturist on Long Island, received shipments of grapes from Schönbrunn and elsewhere in Europe between 1820 and 1829. Sullivan suggests that the "Black Zinfardel of Hungary" mentioned by William Robert Prince in A Treatise on the Vine (1830) may have referred to one of Gibbs' 1829 acquisitions.
Information about Zinfandel is from Wikipedia.

Chardonnay – a green-skinned variety from the Burdundy region of France.

We will plant this week on a southern facing slope on our property in Morgan County. The French varieties require a soil PH of 6.5 – 7.0. We have quite a lot of limestone imbedded deep in our hillside, so the deep root systems of the vines should do well here. We plan to add lavender, basil, thyme, and hyssop as companion plantings for added floral tones.
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Don Abbott
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 113
Location: East Tennessee
Real Name: Don Abbott

PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What state are you in?

Is it too late to be planting in Tennessee?

Where is a good source to get the vines for planting?

My dirt is poor... a lot of slate; very acidic (blackberries love it).

Any hints for a beginner on planting a few vines?

Don
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Patricia A. Proctor
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2010 4:15 pm    Post subject: vineyards Reply with quote

Willis Orchards is in Georgia. I've purchased from seed catalogs in the past, but I liked all the information at Willis. www.willisorchards.com.

You can supplement lime to raise the ph for the grapes. The American varieties need a lower ph.

The Purdue University Extension has a lot of good resource information on growing grapes, but you should check with the Tennessee extension since you need information for local conditions. http://www.utextension.utk.edu/publications/pbfiles/PB1475.pdf

I always thought grapes just grew themselves, but my garden association had a meeting at a local winery where the vineyard director talked about varieties and pruning. Pruning is important.

In keeping with this website's goal of doing this in at least an 18th or 19th century model, i am trying to stay clear of pesticides. Japanese beetles are a problem in Indiana but you can walk through the garden with a bucket of water with a touch of vegetable oil and swish the bugs into the bucket.

Good luck! I'll post photos when we get the vines in the ground.
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Don Abbott
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 113
Location: East Tennessee
Real Name: Don Abbott

PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 6:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the info and the link.

I've got just the spot for them.

Don
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Jim Jacobs
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PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good information Mrs. Proctor, thank you. You've got me toying with the idea of putting in another vine or two.
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