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Early trade beads

 
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wayne1967
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Joined: 26 Jan 2009
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Real Name: Wayne Musgrave

PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:19 pm    Post subject: Early trade beads Reply with quote

What type of beads were seen in trade between the French and Indians during the early 1700's in the central americas. Maybe in the Mississippi river area.
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Michael Galban
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Joined: 15 May 2007
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Location: Iroquoia
Real Name: Michael Galban

PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Check out some of the archeo from French forts. "Guelbert Site" should give you a good place to start.

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Isaac
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Joined: 21 May 2007
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Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Galban wrote:
Check out some of the archeo from French forts. "Guelbert Site" should give you a good place to start.


Isn't that site in Illinois... I thought he wanted Central America?? El Salvador, Costa Rica, Guatemala??? ;-)

Isaac

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twobirds
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Joined: 05 Jun 2007
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Location: East Texas
Real Name: Richard Cole

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 7:10 pm    Post subject: trade beads Reply with quote

Perhaps a bit early, but here's a link to a photo of some of the beads from La Salle's ship "Belle", which wrecked off the Texas coast in 1687.
[url]
http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/belle/images/art-beads.html[/url]

Wish their was more info in this site, but a careful Google search on the Belle will likely turn up more info on the recovered beads.

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twobirds
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Joined: 05 Jun 2007
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Location: East Texas
Real Name: Richard Cole

PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 7:16 pm    Post subject: beads Reply with quote

Perhaps Michael was referring to the "Gilbert Site" in Northeast Texas..

http://www.texasbeyondhistory.net/gilbert/index.html

A French trading location, there's more info about trade beads there, but still woefully short on details.

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Crooked River
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Joined: 12 Dec 2009
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Location: Florida
Real Name: Brent O. Baldwin

PostPosted: Sun May 30, 2010 7:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your best bet might be to get your hands on a copy of Tunica Treasure, by Jeffrey Brain. This has a number of pages of text and color plates showing the tremendous variety of beads collected at the Trudeau site in Louisiana.

This book is sadly out of print, and used copies are awfully dear. You might check with your local library, and see if they could get a copy on interlibrary loan for you.

In any event, the variety of beads traded in New France and Louisiana was impressive, and much too extensive to list on this forum with any degree of completeness.

TwoBirds, thanks for the link to the Gilbert Site. Very interesting. The significance of the buckskin trade in the southeast is not generally given its due. Also, the early horse trade through Texas and Louisiana is not often acknowledged, although there was an excellent article on this topic in Wild West magazine a couple of issues ago. The Indians of that place and time had very well-organized intertribal trade networks, and they were certainly equal partners with the European traders. They were shrewd businessmen and sophisticated politicians.

Crooked River
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