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New Skills

 
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KarlK
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Joined: 24 May 2007
Posts: 287
Location: Grand Portage, Minnesota
Real Name: Karl Koster

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 2:30 pm    Post subject: New Skills Reply with quote

Over the past 20 years I have played with toboggans, snowshoes, bark canoes etc.. This year I challenged myself to learn coopering. Taking classes and buying hard to find tools, I practiced numerous days a week. Here is how the summer of coopering faired:


Some of the tools which became my constant companions:



Late May through September work:
Canteen, tankard, barrels raised, fired and complete, churns, piggens, numerous buckets, tubs etc... (not counting the repair of over 12 barrels, buckets and tubs)



more weeks to go at work, then the coopering begins in the cold garage at home, it has been a blast, a learning blast and it is getting more easy...never too late to learn new skills...getting to the point where I cringe at the early work.

Karl Koster
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Rich Pierce
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 218
Location: St. Louis, MO
Real Name: Richard Pierce

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great undertaking. My great-great grandfather was a cooper and I have a trunk he made and signed, so your adventure is quite exciting to me.
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eseabee1
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Joined: 11 Aug 2009
Posts: 46
Location: PA
Real Name: Edwin McDilda

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow good job I am taking on the task of learning to do quillwork
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Boulanger
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 80
Location: Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit
Real Name: Jeff Pavlik

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 3:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boulanger's order:
1 -1/2 gallon ladel with 3 foot handle to handle hot liquour
1 -8 gallon mash tun (with hole in bottom)
1 -8 gallon recieving tun/ fermenting tun
2 -2 1/2 gallon casks

(Jim Kimpell will be making the tin cooling trays)

(If I have a few years to wait on these... no problem .... LOL)

Great job! You are not only an inspiration, but everyone knows how generous you'll be with your knowledge and skills.
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ditmurier
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 89

Real Name: Mike Tharp

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 3:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dang, Karl! Sweet, I will be placing my order next after the baker!
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Pit
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 139
Location: Corydon Indiana
Real Name: Michael J Goodwin

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice job Karl.What do you prefer wet coopering or dry coopering?Are the tools the same?

_________________
Stop harshing on my mellow.
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Don Beltrami
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 76
Location: New England
Real Name: Don Beltrami

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 8:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeff- sounds like you might be brewing some beer?
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KarlK
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Joined: 24 May 2007
Posts: 287
Location: Grand Portage, Minnesota
Real Name: Karl Koster

PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:32 am    Post subject: Preferred Reply with quote

Pit,
Many seperate coopering by slack or wet or white. Slack for apples or axeheads, wet for beer or wine and white for milk,sugar, flour etc... Personally, I seperate them by items on what I like better.
I like longer staves, churns and buckets are getting more easy and quick to do, tankards/canteens and even some tubs or keelers can be a pain. Again, short staves annoy me.
I play with cedar, aspen, basswood and a little bit of spruce or pine. Cedar is my common wood, it is what is local. Nice coopering history in this area from Fur Trade to Commercial fishing. We have no oak, so I don't mess with it (Thankfully).
Barrels are an overall pain, I have not been trained in barrels, but hope to apprentice some next summer with Dan the cooper at Fort William Historic Park. Keeping buckets tight are easy, but barrels...dang! Once you get into bending staves, it is a whole new ballgame.
Tools: yes, some tools are simple too big for anything but barrels. Making the groove or croze for the heads in small items like tankards or canteens can be slowed since my crozes won't fit in anything smaller than a bucket.
Barrels and canteens have proved the biggest pain so far. In barrels of cedar I heat the wood and bring staves together with a rope windlass, oak barrels like for alcohol, that requires almost truss rings for compression...much more of a pain.
Hoops from willow or ash or cedar still can frustrate me, I have steamed, soaked, I have used various notches and key holes, but still I have not mastered wooden bands yet. I get lucky at times though.
Karl
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Steve Stanley
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 44
Location: Somewhere between 21st century England & 18th century Acadia...........
Real Name: Steve Stanley

PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 4:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As was said above....You are an inspiration....It's nice to know someone is doing the things I'll never get round to......
Steve
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