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Fire, types of

 
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 5:23 pm    Post subject: Fire, types of Reply with quote

Now for the super picky. What is the most authentic fire lay for your Persona?
1. Tipi fire
2, Lean to
3. Hunter's fire
4. Snow top fire
5.Dakota hole
6 Log cabin fire
7, White man's fire
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Pit
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 139
Location: Corydon Indiana
Real Name: Michael J Goodwin

PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What ever works.Heating fires and cooking fires are different.A fire that burns clean is best.

_________________
Stop harshing on my mellow.
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badWind
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

it depends on SEVERAL (too many to list) factors.. basically no larger than necessary for the task
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nogoshe chobee
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Joined: 14 May 2008
Posts: 29
Location: florida
Real Name: mike manzano

PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 5:02 pm    Post subject: fires Reply with quote

from a Seminole prospective, a four point or cross type fire is made so that only the four ends of the logs @ the center of the "cross" burns this make for a very efficient use of wood.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 5:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Using only a spit section of wood,3 or 4 pieces, how can you build a fire on top of snow pack hot enough to cook on?
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Muskeg Stomper
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Joined: 22 Feb 2008
Posts: 15
Location: Mat-Su Valley, Alaska
Real Name: Russ Beauvais

PostPosted: Sat Oct 03, 2009 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dannyb55 wrote:
Using only a spit section of wood,3 or 4 pieces, how can you build a fire on top of snow pack hot enough to cook on?


Is this a riddle or is there some reason to limit yourself a a single split section and three or four pieces? Up in these parts if it's impracticle to clear down to ground level, you have to build a platform on top of the snow. How much wood it takes to build the platform depends on the type of fire you need for the job at hand. If it's for heating a lean-to shelter, you'll want a long platform so that you can have a fire burning along the whole length for maximum heat. Equally important is building a reflector wall behind the fire to reflect heat back towards the shelter.

You may sometimes have to build a platform in layers if the snow is very wet. If the snow is dry, any melt-off under the platform is absorbed by the surrounding snow before it can ever pool up and if you are there for that long, you just add another layer to the platform.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 5:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is the Nordic method. Take three equal pieces of a quartered log. They should be sawn to equal length. Stand all three up on end and leaning together at the top, like you are reassembling the tree. When they balance light a small fire on top. The logs will catch down the center and burn without smoke or visible flame. The flat top is a great place to set a kettle.
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Seminoli
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Joined: 17 Jul 2009
Posts: 7
Location: Florida
Real Name: Pedro Zepeda

PostPosted: Fri Oct 09, 2009 10:56 pm    Post subject: Seminole Fire Reply with quote

To add a little bit more to Nogoshee Chobee's post on the Seminole fire, this style of fire can easily be adapted to use in a village or a temporary camp. When used in a village often the four point "star" fire is made with whole cypress trees about 20 ft. in length and maybe 8 or 10'' in diameter. For a temporary camp smaller pieces of wood can be used, and the advantage being that they don't have to be split up. The disadvantage with this fire is that it doesn't create a very large or hot fire if you are a using it for heat up north, but in florida we don't often need a fire for heating a shelter. It just has to be big enough to cook some food.

Pedro Zepeda
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