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New Boat Project.....Pics
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 2:02 am    Post subject: New Boat Project.....Pics Reply with quote

Been busy the past few weeks on a new punt..... 15' Length, 13" depth, 24"/37" beam, 1:2 flare at beam tapering to 2:5 at qtr. stations and 1:4 at the transoms. I'm getting close to finishing it, but I'm taking my time. If I don't get it varnished before the cold weather sets in it won't be put it on the water until next Spring. Anyway, a few pics....

Making a pattern for the stem and stern......
Laying out....





Cut out.....


and some final dressing with a file.....



Daughter Arwyn helping fill screw holes on side panels....


Completed hull, ready for thwart, tholes and a lot of finish work......



(And my kids were more than happy to try the new punt on for size.)

This boat is no longer or wider in the beam than my pirogue, and the side panels are only slightly wider, but it's amazing how much more capacity and stability this hull has. The punt's not quite as quick in the water as a pirogue, and you don't put one together in 2 or 3 days, but they're a handy boat.
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Pit
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 139
Location: Corydon Indiana
Real Name: Michael J Goodwin

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 3:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice punt Jim.I hope to get on the water next weekend.Good to see ya posting.

_________________
Stop harshing on my mellow.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 8:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Pit. Where you going? Sounds like fun, I'm envious.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This looks like an Ashley River Batteau. Scows like this used to be made out of pine boards, planked fore and aft or cross planked. I have thought many times of building one in b.c.x. plywood and epoxy, good work.
The price of juniper planking and oil paint is so low here on the coast that I might as well make her the old way and caulk her with some cotton and pitch or paint. We have a couple of nice rivers that are deep and slow and wander through deer country. My mind is a whirrin. Thanks friend.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're welcome sir. There's nothing better than hunting from a boat. I'd love to build a good period correct plank scow, but I'm afraid for the timebeing anyway it would probably stay moored in my driveway most of the time. I like the classic lines on the early boats, but period correct or not the modern materials and construction methods are more practical for me. And for reenacting they're certainly no worse than the widely accepted fiberglass bark canoe, IMHO.

Do you have a period picture of an Ashley River Bateau? My punt's built from the 1760 Thames punt plan pictured in Howard Chapelle's, "American Small Sailing Craft."
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 5:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have it on the shelf somewhere, I'll get back to you.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Oct 06, 2009 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Building Classic Small Craft by John Gardner of Mystic Seaports small craft collection. Chapter one, The Common Punt pp 12-14. These things are probably on Trajan's Column in Rome. Big Scows are well documented By Chappell in American Small Sailing Craft and the New Jersey Garvey is a Developed Version. The Basic slab sided scow is the standard floating bridge unit for all of the European Armies and You can probably find it in Diderot.
On the other hand the dugout is older. If you want to make a dugout that will not crack when dry, Lamminate one up out of 2x and carve it out with a chain saw, skil saw and a power plane. Finish it with a belt sander then epoxy coat it and give it a coat of barn paint or whatever. Around my way the Crusoe Islanders were making dugouts out of sunken Cypres logs about 12 feet log with 3-4 inches of freeboard, as late as the 1980s. Bon Chance, Danny
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim,
My wife says you are a bad influence... LOL. Now I wanna build a punt :-)

Dave
One of these days I am going to join you on your November expedition.... one of these days, sigh.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Nov 04, 2009 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The bateau I am refering to is square all around, your straight stock stays straight. A table saw will come in handy. Hint Hint.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

carlilex wrote:
Jim,
My wife says you are a bad influence... LOL. Now I wanna build a punt :-)

Dave
One of these days I am going to join you on your November expedition.... one of these days, sigh.

A familiar accusation, Dave, but really, my motives are pure.

That'd be great to undertake an expedition with you. Maybe at some point we could find a body of water running through some big woods halfway between Indiana and your neck of the woods. Incidently, I looked for you at Niagara this year and was disappointed to find you weren't there.



Quote:
The bateau I am refering to is square all around, your straight stock stays straight. A table saw will come in handy. Hint Hint.

I looked up the plan for this bateau, and it does look like it'd be real easy to build, just a box with the bottom ends upswept. The un-flared sides and lack of camber on your bateau makes it a somewhat different animal than the Thames Punt I'm building. (At this point in the project I wish I'd have kept it simpler. Maybe I'd be out on the water before next Spring.) I've also deviated a little bit from Chappelle's 1760 Thames punt plan, in that I've flared the sides more, 1:2 at midships instead of 1:4 as shown in the plan. This gave it a bit more rocker and capacity, and it should give it a little more freeboard.

And as to the tablesaw, yessir I do have one, but I wouldn't sign my name to the parts it turns out without a good deal of rasping and sanding.
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Jim Jacobs"]
carlilex wrote:
Jim,
My wife says you are a bad influence... LOL. Now I wanna build a punt :-)

Dave
Incidently, I looked for you at Niagara this year and was disappointed to find you weren't there.


.

I was registered to go but my mom went into the hospital that weekend. I would have loved to chat over a cup of joe.

Jim Jacobs wrote:
carlilex wrote:
Jim,
My wife says you are a bad influence... LOL. Now I wanna build a punt :-)

Dave
One of these days I am going to join you on your November expedition.... one of these days, sigh.

A familiar accusation, Dave, but really, my motives are pure.

That'd be great to undertake an expedition with you. Maybe at some point we could find a body of water running through some big woods halfway between Indiana and your neck of the woods. .


I'm not adverse to travelling out to Indiana, or where ever between NH and there. It's not the distance as much as its the time off.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 9:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We do alot of fine tuning with a Black and Decker high speed grinder with 36 g discs. At home I like my jack plane and low angle block plane.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

carlilex wrote:
I'm not adverse to travelling out to Indiana, or where ever between NH and there. It's not the distance as much as its the time off.

Ditto here, Dave.

Tell you what, if you're going to travel all that distance we need to undertake a voyage worthy of your effort. I have a longstanding dream of traveling the Wabash between Ouiatenon and Massac, a distance of some 500 miles that should take around 10 days. If I ever again think I can snag the time to do it I'll let you know well in advance.
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Jacobs wrote:
carlilex wrote:
I'm not adverse to travelling out to Indiana, or where ever between NH and there. It's not the distance as much as its the time off.

Ditto here, Dave.

Tell you what, if you're going to travel all that distance we need to undertake a voyage worthy of your effort. I have a longstanding dream of traveling the Wabash between Ouiatenon and Massac, a distance of some 500 miles that should take around 10 days. If I ever again think I can snag the time to do it I'll let you know well in advance.


That sounds awesome!! Maybe we will come up with something.
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giantmonster
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:36 am    Post subject: re: Reply with quote

Thats a nice work jim.. i would love to know more detailing of how to create one of these....If you can help me out..
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