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Petiagua

 
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Stinky Mike
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 142
Location: Spanish East Florida
Real Name: Mike Harper

PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 3:23 pm    Post subject: Petiagua Reply with quote

Whilst going through some of Von Reck's drawings, I came across this and thought it was pretty neat.

I like how they have the sails set, the awning rigged over the helm, and the rigging.

All in all a pretty neat view of a coastal/inland waterway vessel of Georgia in the 1730's.



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Mike
"Well, it [the bible] seems to be a good book-strange that the white people are not better, after having had it so long" Chief Yonaguska (Drowning Bear)
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Captain Midnight
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Joined: 26 Jun 2007
Posts: 41
Location: Clarksville, TN
Real Name: Jeffrey Greene

PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2010 7:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmmm....I wonder what modern boat plans would most resemble this hull...
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Crooked River
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Joined: 12 Dec 2009
Posts: 41
Location: Florida
Real Name: Brent O. Baldwin

PostPosted: Thu Sep 27, 2012 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike,

Thanks! for posting this! I don't know if I had heard of Von Reck before. If so, it did not stick in my appallingly faulty memory. I Googled "Von Reck drawings" and found a whole album of images form the coastal southeast in the 1730s. Cool!

I was up visiting Fort King George in Darien, Georgia earlier this week. The map of the fort indicated a "scout boat" would be beached near the water, but no boat was to be found. I later encountered a park ranger and struck up a conversation. I did mention that I was disappointed that there was no boat, and he said, "You want to see a scout boat? I can show you one!"

Their scout boat was on a trailer in a storage area. The ranger was kind enough to pull back the canvas cover so I could check 'er out. He said it was basically a Beachcomber Dory, with the plans enlarged from the original 18' dory to a larger 22' model. It appeared to be fiberglass, with brightwork of oak, or amybe ash. It had a swinging keel, and was built to accommodate a sail, althought the mast was not in place at the time.

While not strictly authentic, I thought this particular vessel struck a pretty happy medium as a practical, modern boat that resembled the originals used on the Inland Passage back in the day.

Brent
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