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MILITIA PACK WEIGHT.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2008 4:58 pm    Post subject: MILITIA PACK WEIGHT. Reply with quote

I have been reading as much as I can regarding early to mid 18th century militia equipment and trail foods. Militia on scouts they say could be out from 10 days to several months. Now obviously we can not be expected to carry 3 months worth of trail foods, but what about a week or ten days? Looking at the lists, at the amount of food stuffs; the powder and lead ratio, and all the other equipment required, this seems to add up to a lot of weight. Now perhaps this is just the way it was, maybe they simply had to put up with this weight in order to carry out their scouting mission successfuly.
I, and I am sure many others would be interested to hear from some experienced trekkers, as to what they carry, and what their equipment all-up weighs? Looking forward to some replies and answers, Regards, Le Loup.
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two veuzs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2008 3:36 pm    Post subject: MILITIA PACK WEIGHT Reply with quote

Le Loup--
I had access to a digital scale and satisfied my curiousity as to how much weight I was carrying around. I didnt count first layer of clothes which is breech clout, deerskin leggings, moccasins, flop hat and linen shirt. Here's what I came up with:
Whitney blanket 4-pt 6.30lbs.
5x7 oilcloth 4.60
Haversack (Full, with food for a week) 7.96
.50 cal flintlock rifle 8.50
Bullet bag and powder horn 5.25
Small axe in sheath 1.74
Full canteen (1 qt.) 4.12
Frock, wool waistcoat & wool shirt 6.34
TOTAL 43.53 lbs.
In extreme winter weather, zero or below, I add mittens, winter moccasins with blanket liners, heavy wool socks and half blanket which adds another 4.14 lbs. for a total of 47.67 lbs which is heavier than it feels. I have carried this gear for all day and forget the weight after awhile. Note that weapons account for 15 1/2 pounds!
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 2:12 am    Post subject: WEIGHT OF EQUIPMENT, FOOD & CLOTHING. Reply with quote

Denny, thanks for the feedback, this is just the sort of thing we need. I have no doubt that you have a few items not mentioned in your list that we all tend to take for granted. Your calculation of weight is not far off mine, & supports my findings so far, that maybe this is the true weight, & people just have to put up with carrying it if they wish to remain self-reliant.
Thanks again Denny, much appreciated. This may even promote further articles for ON THE TRAIL MAGAZINE! Regards, Keith.
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two veuzs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2008 8:37 pm    Post subject: wieght of equipment food and clothing Reply with quote

Keith, I originally did this exercise in weighing my gear at the request of trekking partners at a beaver trapping camp who wanted to know how my pack was considerably smaller than theirs. You are astute in noticing some items we all commonly carry not being mentioned, but they are included in the final weight, I just need to get more detailed. From my original letter to them: "... I count the first layer of clothes, hat and belt knife as included in my personal weight at 180 lbs ... the haversack is a large leather one and I sling it as close to the center of my back as possible. The bed roll is on its own strap and I fold it rather than roll it. It is carried between my back and the haversack. In the haversack is flint and steel, tinder, sewing kit, tin of moccasin grease, toilet kit (comb soap and toothbrush), linen rags, 20 feet of rope, journal, extra wool socks, small tin pot, salt container & spoon and bags of pemmican mix, oatmeal, rice and walnuts with raisins..." This gear does not change whether afoot, afloat or ahorse, though the haversack is then replaced by saddlebags. The oil cloth is both my raingear and shelter. On horseback everything must come in at under 25% of the weight of the animal as a rule of thumb which for my 1100 lb horse means under 275 lbs.
Saddle and 30 X 60 saddle blanket 22.56 lbs
Tack(bridle halter and lead rope, hobbles and 40 foot picket rope) 9.90 lbs
other gear and weapons 43.53 lbs
Myself 180 lbs
TOTAL 260.09 lbs Whew, I made it! I can now add a few lbs of extra food or better yet, more powder and lead. Happy trails.
Denny
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2008 1:47 am    Post subject: PACK WEIGHT. Reply with quote

Thanks again Denny. As a matter of interest, do you carry spare lock springs and tools? Regards, Keith.
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two veuzs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 7:58 pm    Post subject: spare lock parts Reply with quote

My rifle shot pouch which I weighed for this discussion contains an entire spare lock, since I replaced the cheap Dixie lock my rifle came with an L &R replacement lock and I kept the original for a back up. I carry a mainspring vise and spare mainspring when carrying the Brown Bess. Denny
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2008 9:43 pm    Post subject: LOCK PARTS & TOOLS. Reply with quote

I do not have a complete lock, but if I had one I would carry it. I do carry spare springs and a spare hammer & spring vice & turn screw. Once bitten, twice shy. Keith.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never forget that in the past they had pack animals, Even in the East.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 6:47 pm    Post subject: Pack weight & Pack horses. Reply with quote

[quote="dannyb55"]Never forget that in the past they had pack animals, Even in the East.[/quote]

True, but to use one well known charracter as an example, Daniel Boone mostly seems to have travelled on foot then later sends back for pack animals to come and collect the peltry.
I think the reason for this is that the horses leave too much sign and noise and are easily spotted.
The mail may have been delivered by a post rider, but runners on foot were still used. I think it depends on the area and circumstances.
Regardless, I am a woodsman on foot and that is the charracter and scenario I seek information for.
Le Loup.
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 7:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe you need some captives to carry the heavy goods. It would be a great way to break in the probies.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 7:47 pm    Post subject: Captives carry heavy goods! Reply with quote

[quote="dannyb55"]Maybe you need some captives to carry the heavy goods. It would be a great way to break in the probies.[/quote]

Actually I don't think I have any heavy goods but that is not a bad idea. Perhaps I could put up a sign on my front property gate, "Tresspassers Will Be Used To Carry Heavy Goods".
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dannyb55
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe you could use tourists, when they are in season, I hear that there is no bag limit.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:19 pm    Post subject: Tourists! Reply with quote

[quote="dannyb55"]Maybe you could use tourists, when they are in season, I hear that there is no bag limit.[/quote]

[b]No tourists this far out Danny, thank goodness.
Le Loup.[/b]
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wsmith
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Joined: 30 May 2007
Posts: 144
Location: South of Colorado Springs, Colorado
Real Name: Wendell K. Smith

PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Weighed my stuff this morning before heading out this afternoon. Basic gear, two days rations, water,one blanket, small oil cloth, extra socks and shirt, firelock included, 35 pounds.

_________________
Wendell K. Smith
2nd Connecticut Regiment of Militia
ALRA #106
Qui Transtulit Sustinet
(He who transplanted still sustains us)

Recovering FARB, Farbs Anonymous
Embrace the 12 step program :)
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 5:05 pm    Post subject: Pack Weight. Reply with quote

[quote="wsmith"]Weighed my stuff this morning before heading out this afternoon. Basic gear, two days rations, water,one blanket, small oil cloth, extra socks and shirt, firelock included, 35 pounds.[/quote]

Thanks for this info, well done. Much appreciated.
Regards, Le Loup.

PS. Would be pleased to have you check out this post below and give your opinion.

[url]http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com/2010/07/scenario-and-question.html[/url]
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