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authentic lock oils

 
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walks with gun
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 3:08 pm    Post subject: authentic lock oils Reply with quote

It's probably been asked a dozen times, but has anyone learned how and what type of oil was carried to oil the lock on a flinter ?. I kinda figure a small twig broken off and frayed out would work as a replacement for a modern toothbrush for cleaning around the lock, but what oil would have stayed liquified during cold weather. Sorry such a long post.
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NWTF Longhunter
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Joined: 29 Jun 2008
Posts: 73
Location: Michigan
Real Name: Ron W LaClair

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 5:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sperm Oil is/was the best for all kinds of weather. You could even lube your patches with it.



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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sperm oil is great, though would be [and is, I bet!] expensive and hard to come by. Around villages, pig or sheep oil. Bear oil, too. Both will stay liquid if REALLY well-rendered. I'd keep mine on the stove for about 24 hours tending to it and removing anything that forms in it.

I've shot in -30 weather and boy that's rough. I only wiped a touch of oil on bearing surfaces--a touch! Essentially--dry.
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knappinman
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Joined: 17 May 2007
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Location: Utah
Real Name: Jason Vilos

PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2008 5:30 pm    Post subject: sweet oil Reply with quote

I have heard that olive oil sometimes referred to as sweet oil was also used and it would have been as common as sperm oil. am I wrong on this one? I dont have any documentation but I know it is out there because I have read it (boy that is a crappy bibliography) sorry
Jason
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Ed...Maurer....
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While olive oil, like sperm oil, may have been used, I'm inclined to think that any imported products would have been too expensive, too hard to acquire and not seen as a wise choice when bear, beaver, pigs and sheep and their products--hides, meat and oils, were readily available, cheap and easily replaced when in the back country or around settlements. There's an old adage--"If God wanted us to shoot caplocks, he would have lined the streams with caps," or something to that effect. So, [my long winded point is] use what was readily and affordably available!
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knappinman
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Real Name: Jason Vilos

PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ed,
That is not neccessarily true and I guess it depends on the time and place. Olive oil is used to produce castille soap which was imported from spain and it shows up as being relaively cheap. it would seem that olive oil would be the same. I will have to do some looking to try and find out out the truth. I am inclined to agree with you Ed on your point about using hog lard or other animal oils that were readily available and virtually free for anyone with the wherewithal to produce them at home in the rendering pot. I have heard coon oil makes a good substitute for bear.
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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, yeah, time and place is always a given. My expectation is that the 'person' is beyond the frontier, living off the land and the only consumable commodity he'd be sure to carry enough of is powder; everything else he needs is found around him. Near settlements, things are different. Recall Washington's comments on the frontier folk he met? Doubt they had any olive oil about!
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Rocky River Longrifles
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Joined: 20 Mar 2008
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Location: South of the Caney Fork River, Middle TN
Real Name: Mark Hillis

PostPosted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

From what I've read , bear oil was highly prized and readily available to frontiersmen . I havnt' came across any references to hogs or sheep on the frontier ( at least in my area and time ) . Unfortunately, bear are not readily available now in my area but coon and beaver are .
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kent klein
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Joined: 05 Jun 2007
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Real Name: Kent Klein

PostPosted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 10:42 pm    Post subject: My 2 cents Reply with quote

Several years ago while fleshing beaver tails I ended up with a good pile of beaver tail fat. I threw this in a pan, (outside) and simmered it for sometime. I then pored the liquid through a looser weave fabric to strain it out. What I have found through various expeariments is this: It will not harden/jell, etc. to at least minus 12 degrees F. It will not change its viscosity in temps to 105 F at least. It does not go rancid. It lubicates a lock like you wouldn't believe. It is not offensive oder wise. K. Klein
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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2008 9:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah--semantics. Yes. Many of us think of the 'frontier' as the wild lands, but scholars define it as the edges-- (Wikipedia)"'Frontier' was borrowed into English from French in the 15th century with the meaning "borderland," the region of a country that fronts on another country (see also marches). The use of frontier to mean "a region at the edge of a settled area" is a special North American development."' --which was my use, sorry. I should have clarified myself and said the domestic animals were extant in frontier settlements. Mea culpa!

Beaver! I've used beaver and it didn't occur to me to mention that. Good stuff!
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