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Wake up call

 
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coloneltubbs
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 341
Location: Houston, Texas
Real Name: Jerry Tubbs

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 12:39 pm    Post subject: Wake up call Reply with quote

For those of you who take your dog into the field with you, should appreciate this short story.
This past weekend I along with a few other friends camp near the small town of Columbus, Texas. Located next to the town is the Colorado river. This location is the same where the Texas Army crossed staying ahead of the advancing Mexican Army. We were invited to set up camp in the County Park and give a show and tell to the public as part of the town's "Live Oak" celebration.
Well, my dog "Henry" and I arrived Friday afternoon and set up camp. I went a minimal as possible and in doing so my cover was a diamond shelter. Ol' Henry was as happy as a dog could be chasing anything that moved. As the evening round down and sleep was soon upon Henry and I, we headed for bed. Fearing Henry might take off in the night after Lord knows what, I tied him to the pole holding up the shelter. It seems that dogs have the uncanny way of going in circles so it was not long he had run out of leash and was tugging on the support pole. I got up and straighten the mess out and not waiting to have to do this again in the night I did the unthinkable. I tied his leash to my wrist, scolded him some, and told Henry to go to sleep. Okay, by now you know what is coming. Yep, I was sound asleep when Henry decided to take off after something he had seen. I was ranked off of the blankets with my right arm extended as far over my head as it could go without dislocating it. Boy, what a rush that was.
I pulled Henry back to me and picked him up and forced him as deep as I could push to the back of the shelter. I then blocked any exits with my person and let him know an no uncertain terms he best go to sleep and stay there. He knew he had made a costly error and decided it was time to sleep for the rest of the night.
I am now so sore I can hardly lift my right arm and dare not sneeze. Oh the pain caused by a sneeze.
Lesson well learned is carry a VERY short leash and one extra long tent stake. I cannot say for certain if Henry learned any thing from this adventure.

I remain yours,
Colonel Tubbs
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Gonzales
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Joined: 29 Oct 2007
Posts: 103
Location: Saint Louis
Real Name: Larry Gonzales

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 3:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Howdy Colonel Tubbs,

Sorry that happened to you, what kind o' critter is Henry?

I am assuming a pretty large breed?

Best Regards
Larry
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coloneltubbs
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 341
Location: Houston, Texas
Real Name: Jerry Tubbs

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 3:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Henry is 62# of mix breed shepherd. We were blessed with him when he was found abandon at around six weeks old. Henry has a gentle disposition and loves people. Like most dogs, all he wants is to please his master.

CT
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Swanny
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 186
Location: Two Rivers, Alaska
Real Name: Thomas Swan

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep. Seen it right off!!

For those contemplating similar adventures, a dog can chew through even a stout leash or rope in one bite. Chain is PC and works better. Cable is not PC, but it's a lot lighter than chain. For multiple dogs, consider making up a picket line.

Swanny (and the Stardancer Historical Freight Dog gang - most of whom have very itchy teeth and a big case of wanderlust).

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“A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other.” (William Francis Butler) Stardancer Historical Freight Dogs at http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup...was yanked off a short cot by the ankle once....only once.
My dalmation was 68#...I was almost in the fire pit before I got stopped.
Long tentstakes are great.
My ankle shill shows a scar.

I hope your shoulder heals.

BTW....still looking for a cure for the night yelps/barks...I just have to get her out more I guess...or only use a fly...she is ok if she can see out.

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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Steve Stanley
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 44
Location: Somewhere between 21st century England & 18th century Acadia...........
Real Name: Steve Stanley

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Noted with interest....Due to dog-sitter moving,we're going to have to start taking our two Lurchers to events....any advice appreciated.
Steve
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Swanny
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 186
Location: Two Rivers, Alaska
Real Name: Thomas Swan

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 3:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Steve Stanley wrote:
Noted with interest....Due to dog-sitter moving,we're going to have to start taking our two Lurchers to events....any advice appreciated.
Steve


Are your dogs well trained and socialized? If so, it shouldn't be any more difficult than taking them to visit friends or on a hunting expedition. On the other hand, if they are not well trained and socialized you and they may find it to be extremely stressful. Here are just a few tips, and I'm sure others will come up with even more.

- Try to keep them on the same feeding / playing / sleeping schedule as they are at home.

- Bring a copy of your dog's veterinary records along, just in case you need to seek emergency vet care while out and about. At the very least they need to have either their rabies tags on their collars or you need to have their rabies vaccination certificate close at hand.

- Be sure your dogs can be identified and returned should the lose their way. All of my dogs are microchipped in addition to having a plate with my kennel name and phone number riveted to their collars. (riveted plates don't get tangled and pulled off in brush). Take photographs of them in case you need to hang "wanted" posters or seek local assistance to corral runaways.

- Get them accustomed to being tethered in strange locations before taking them to events. Especially places where people are coming and going.

- Try to set up your camp at the edge of the camping area, away from the center of activity.

- Try to arrange for them to get lots of exercise in the early morning, and again in the late evening. Tired dogs are well behaved dogs (and vice versa).

- Be sure they have fresh, clear water in front of them all the time.

- Take any materials you may need to provide them with shade and shelter.

- When I take only a couple of dogs I have a portable crate (kennel) I can use to confine one or two dogs at night - to avoid getting yanked out of bed at the end of a leash. They are less reactive when inside the shelter near me. When I have more than two I set up a picket line exactly the same way as when we are out mushing on the trail.

- Poop scoop their tie out area at least twice a day to keep things tidy and sanitary and keep your camp neighbors much happier.

- Don't encourage strangers to interact with your dogs. People, especially tourist-type people, are really stupid around dogs. All dogs (even yours) are capable of all canine behaviors at any given time, and the only dog that can't bit is the dog without teeth (and he can gum you pretty badly). When I take dogs to events I make it a point to ask people to not visit the dogs unless I am there to supervise. This is especially important with children.

That should be a good start. As I say, I'm sure others will chime in with their own suggestions right quick.

_________________
“A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other.” (William Francis Butler) Stardancer Historical Freight Dogs at http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Thu May 22, 2008 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the only thing you may have missed is the pooperscoop option in the pocket...

Here is a biggie....make sure before the trip that the dogs are welcome and able to be on site after hours ..(vs visitors time)

Swanny,,,why would my girl be less 'excitable' and less likely to challenge bark (I think she heard cyotes in the distance or racoons in the woods ) inside the tent vs out under the fly? I've not tried the portable crate (have one of nylabone's collapsable ones)..she is not used to it and I'd think it would increase her anxiety..

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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Swanny
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Joined: 17 May 2007
Posts: 186
Location: Two Rivers, Alaska
Real Name: Thomas Swan

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hawkeye wrote:

Swanny,,,why would my girl be less 'excitable' and less likely to challenge bark (I think she heard cyotes in the distance or racoons in the woods ) inside the tent vs out under the fly? I've not tried the portable crate (have one of nylabone's collapsable ones)..she is not used to it and I'd think it would increase her anxiety..


A lot of dogs feel the need to go on guard duty while their master/mistress is sleeping. Dogs tethered outside sometimes feel they need to alert to anything that comes around within their sensory range. By putting them inside you limit the amount of area the dog feels that s/he is responsible for.

A lot depends on the individual dog, of course. A dog that grew up going to events will be more comfortable in the event environment, and less reactive. A dog that rarely goes to events is much more likely to become a nuisance just because she is uncertain of her surroundings and role.

A dog that normally lives indoors will be more comfortable inside a shelter than out - and a dog that thinks of bicycles as fetch toys will LOVE horseback riders.

Swanny

_________________
“A good dog is so much a nobler beast than an indifferent man that one sometimes gladly exchanges the society of one for that of the other.” (William Francis Butler) Stardancer Historical Freight Dogs at http://www.tworiversak.com/mushing.htm
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edwardamason
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 2:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

[quote="Swanny"]
Hawkeye wrote:



A dog that normally lives indoors will be more comfortable inside a shelter than out - and a dog that thinks of bicycles as fetch toys will LOVE horseback riders.

Swanny


Won't take the dog very long to learn better.

I use to camp a bunch as a child and young adult.I use to let my dog sleep in the tent with me.She liked it that way.Until the day we had a bigger dog come crashing into the tent to get to her.She was in heat.Boy did he wreck a perfectly good tent.

I second the motion for long tent steak and rope.Although a good tree will do the job.
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Fri May 23, 2008 7:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Swanny wrote:

A lot of dogs feel the need to go on guard duty while their master/mistress is sleeping. Dogs tethered outside sometimes feel they need to alert to anything that comes around within their sensory range. By putting them inside you limit the amount of area the dog feels that s/he is responsible for.

A dog that rarely goes to events is much more likely to become a nuisance just because she is uncertain of her surroundings and role.


And I think that is a key...I misprinted what I meant earlier...she doesn't fuss as much when we are just under a fly, or under a tree. She does the little bark thing inside a tent...where she can't see..

dog going to events....uncertain of surroundings....there may be the key. I have often taken her squirrel/bird hunting with me and we just stay out in the woods at night..she does great. I think you are right, she is used to that. She is not used to being inside the tent. I will try a kennel cage the next event where I must have a tent. There is always the truck in the parking lot where we both can get some sleep. :)
Thanks.

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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owl
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Joined: 24 Mar 2008
Posts: 87
Location: sierra foothills
Real Name: michael wilkerson

PostPosted: Sat May 24, 2008 9:36 am    Post subject: wake up call Reply with quote

Dogs, just like children and adults should only be allowed if they can behave themselves. Purse dogs should'nt be allowed anywhere!

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owl
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
Posts: 473
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That is why I am trying to train her.
I am just tring to think like her.

She's not a purse dog/ankle snapper, she's of the oldest hunting breed and stands knee high (to me) at her shoulder.

On the other hand, I saw a person playing the part of a rat catcher back east....he had two terriers...I think they were jack russels.
Quite authentic. and carried in the pockets of his heavy overcoat when not on the ground.
That was 20+ years ago so I have no idea who it was.

_________________
http://www.muddyflint.com/ http://muddyflinttrades.com/
Empty pockets never held anyone back. Only empty heads and empty hearts can do that.—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE
If interested in American Co-Masonry; http://www.co-masonry.org/
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