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Cast Iron Cookware
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Jason
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Joined: 14 May 2007
Posts: 579
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Jason W. Gatliff

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:45 pm    Post subject: Cast Iron Cookware Reply with quote

If you use cast iron in camp----instead of seasoning with oil or grease, use pure beeswax-----heat it and rub in the beeswax as it melts-----let cool.
Beeswax is a natural thing---won't hurt you----doesn't get rancid like grease and some oils. Retreat as necessary.
Over time it builds up and you will only have to touch up once in awhile.

Submitted by: Doc Cox - coxf@ih.navy.mil on August 27, 2004

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chuckcolas
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:59 am    Post subject: beeswax and cast iron Reply with quote

Would it be good to season a brand new dutch oven with beeswax? I have never heard of that being done, but it sure sounds like a good idea. Does it do anything to the taste?
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Mr.Westover
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Joined: 21 Sep 2007
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Location: Salt Lake City
Real Name: Brian Westover

PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2008 12:29 pm    Post subject: beeswax Reply with quote

Beeswax is an amazing substance. No known element on earth will disolve it, although it can melt and or wear off. There are some acids that are stored in beeswax bottles because nothing else will hold them. And it is completly non toxic.
I have been hearing recently that the honeybees are vanishing for no apperant reason, that scientists are trying to figure it out but to no avail. Beekeepers are rerporting that there are no dead bee carcasses in the hives, that they just arent returning. I dont know if this is true but if it is watch for prices to skyrocket.

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Rita aka Kiziah
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:13 pm    Post subject: Re: beeswax and cast iron Reply with quote

chuckcolas wrote:
Would it be good to season a brand new dutch oven with beeswax? I have never heard of that being done, but it sure sounds like a good idea. Does it do anything to the taste?


I had learned of this only last year and did up my cast iron. Beeswax works wonderfully. There is no aftertaste to your food. As previously stated, it does not become rancid. It's far better to use beeswax then to use shortening. Smart person who thought of it, even smarter people follow the suggestion. :-)
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attheeasterndoor
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2008 1:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just make sure you get PURE beeswax as I have found that some of what is being sold has been cut with paraffin which is a petroleum byproduct. (to offset material cost?) Burnt paraffin/beeswax will make things taste rather unpleasant. Not to mention that I don't know the health implications.
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Harrod
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Joined: 31 Jan 2008
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Location: Kentucky
Real Name: Tim Matherly

PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't they use paraffin in canning and making some candies?Harrod in the Bluegrass.
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attheeasterndoor
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PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 1:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They sure do, canning, coatings on candies etc. In a world where companies are trying to make a huge profit on minimal spending, what care do they have with regard to public health. (Many current accounts of this for the off-topic list?) But the burning of the wax creates fumes that are toxic. I read a consumer reports article on safety issues of candles where the article recommended bees wax candles over paraffins due to the toxicity of the fumes generated from burning not to mention the high amount of carbon.(combined carcinogens) Especially in the confined spaces of the home. Not much different from the non-stick Teflon coated cookware today and the health issues attributed to it. But thats another subject altogether. I strongly recommend the use of beeswax and wholeheartedly agree with Jason on using it for cookware. Bee products are truly amazing on so many levels.
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Hawkeye
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Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My grandmother always put up jelly with parafin tops..

I am still using her grizwolds (after the teft, now limited to hosehold daily use) she only used beeswax on her ironware. would never use the parafin or old candles...perhaps she knew something.

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morton_rooster
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2008 5:44 pm    Post subject: absconding bees Reply with quote

Yes there are many beekeepers losing many hives through absconding.
An early theory was that the cell phone towers with high powered radio waves were causing the bees to get disoriented but that would not explain the whole hive leaving as the queen and attendants don't go out of the hive anyway. A more recent idea is that some of the newer insecticides used on crops and yards may change some of the (i guess genetics for the homing instinct) but that still doesn't seem to explain the whole hive disappearance. It is becoming a very serious problem for beekeepers and for all of us as far as pollination is concerned. Though the honeybee is not native to America we surely have gotten accustomed to having them around.

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freedom475
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Joined: 05 Dec 2008
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Location: Rocky Mountains of Montana
Real Name: Wes Daems

PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 1:17 am    Post subject: Re: beeswax Reply with quote

Mr.Westover wrote:
Beeswax is an amazing substance. No known element on earth will disolve it, although it can melt and or wear off.

Is this a true Fact???...

I love bee's wax and use it all the time for many things, I have tried often to remove it with different things and have never been successful, maybe this is why.

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CT03
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Joined: 14 Oct 2009
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Real Name: Christopher Treichel

PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The only thing I have learned about removing wax/ beeswax is to take some brown paper (like brown paper bags) and put it over the wax and use a hot iron over it which will draw the wax out of cloth or wood. remember to turn the steam function off or it will be a little messy.

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TiminIndiana
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Joined: 19 Dec 2009
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Real Name: Tim Wieneke

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 5:04 am    Post subject: Re: absconding bees Reply with quote

morton_rooster wrote:
Yes there are many beekeepers losing many hives through absconding.
An early theory was that the cell phone towers with high powered radio waves were causing the bees to get disoriented but that would not explain the whole hive leaving as the queen and attendants don't go out of the hive anyway. A more recent idea is that some of the newer insecticides used on crops and yards may change some of the (i guess genetics for the homing instinct) but that still doesn't seem to explain the whole hive disappearance. It is becoming a very serious problem for beekeepers and for all of us as far as pollination is concerned. Though the honeybee is not native to America we surely have gotten accustomed to having them around.

rooster



An asian bee parasite called nosema ceranae somehow migrated to the US and is hitting bee colonies here and in Europe pretty hard.
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
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Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah but that is observable, and they are treating it, but the sudden loss of multiple hive remains unexplained. However, it is NOT the crisis that PBS and others would have us believe. The European honey bee out competes other pollinators, but the decline in them has allowed other pollinators such as bumble bees and carpenter bees to thrive, and take up the slack. While there was a lack of honey bees in my garden this year..., there was no lack of bees, butterflies, and other pollinating insects. In addition, if all of the insect pollinators disappeared, only about 6% of all crops, and NONE of the staples such as rice, wheat, corn, oats, barley would be dammaged.

Here is some recent information:

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20427316.800


LD

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Jim Jacobs
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 21, 2009 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know there's a decline in Honey Bees overall, but the numbers I saw in this part of the country this year compared to the last few gave me some hope. Seemed to be a banner year for them in various parts of the Wabash Valley.

CT03 wrote:
The only thing I have learned about removing wax/ beeswax is to take some brown paper (like brown paper bags) and put it over the wax and use a hot iron over it which will draw the wax out of cloth or wood. remember to turn the steam function off or it will be a little messy.

An old art technique, CT, used in Batik/Wax resist dying. I use an old stove top iron and newspapers to take candle wax out of my blankets. Seems like I have to do that once every year or two.
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Gobae
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Joined: 23 Mar 2010
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Real Name: Dan Crowther

PostPosted: Tue Mar 23, 2010 8:09 am    Post subject: Re: beeswax Reply with quote

Mr.Westover wrote:
Beeswax is an amazing substance. No known element on earth will disolve it, although it can melt and or wear off.


I know this is an old thread, but I thought I would correct this info.

"Beeswax is soluble in ether, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and vegetable oils,it is sparingly soluble in benzene and carbon disulfide when cold but insoluble in water and mineral oil." - Lipid index material data sheet

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