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Preventing "After Cleaning" Rust
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Jason
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Joined: 14 May 2007
Posts: 579
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Jason W. Gatliff

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:41 pm    Post subject: Preventing "After Cleaning" Rust Reply with quote

I can't claim this as my own, but it's a great tip and well worth passing along. About the only way to get a gun completely dry after washing it out is to use boiling hot water. Anything less will leave moisture behind and that will allow rust, even after oiling. (Oil and water don't mix too well) Even dry patches and tow can leave a little dampness behind. So, after washing with water, I give my firelocks a shot of
W-D40. You can also use a saturated patch for the bore and outside of the gun. W-D40 displaces moisture, but is not intended for long term storage. I wipe off the excess and then follow up with my favorite gun oil. Now, doing this in a period correct manner is up to you. Boiling water may be the only answer. Period correct lubes range from neatsfoot, whale, Sweet (Olive) or bear oils. Any ideas ?

Submitted by: Pete - petestines@yahoo.com on January 07, 2004

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Jeremy Ray
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Joined: 13 Nov 2007
Posts: 38
Location: Tuckertown, Tennessee just below Lost Creek
Real Name: Jeremy Ray

PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I clean my rifle in the field, I will go over it with some lard/beeswax mixture to help prevent rust and keep any other moisture that may get on the barrel and other metal parts off. I even put a patch of the stuff down my barrel to help prevent rust from occurring. Its a 50/50 mixture of beeswax to lard. Put your lard in a pot and melt that first, then add the beeswax (be careful!), and then let both of those melt together. Find you a good tin can (about the size of a round musket cap tin) to put the mix in and let set. Once set, the mixture makes a nice paste that you can easily rub on your gun and its parts. This is also a good thing to put on your weapon while in storage. I usually put the paste on while the gun is still warm from the water to allow the grease and wax to easily go into the pours of the metal. Its just like seasoning an iron pot or skillet.

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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For 20 years ALL I ever used to protect my iron was linseed oil, even the bore. Compare it to any other and I think you'll be pleased.
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Rocky River Longrifles
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Joined: 20 Mar 2008
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Location: South of the Caney Fork River, Middle TN
Real Name: Mark Hillis

PostPosted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you don't mind it not being a period product , Sheath from Birchwood Casey will prevent rust during storage . I use it on all my guns .

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Bogie
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 7:36 am    Post subject: Cleaning Reply with quote

Hello,
I clean after shooting,leave off the lock,and "re-visit" the weapon for several days after.Looking for red rust,I remove any from problem areas with straight Ballistol,or any good quality gun cleaner,and check the bore again.
If long-term storage is required I apply a thicker product,a grease-type substance.
The reason why rust develops long term is because the stuff you applied originally has evaporated and little protection now exists.
The military developed cosmoline for long term,but many commercial grease-like products are now available.
I have been using a home-made lanolin and beeswax concoction which is excellent.
Bogie
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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2008 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Curiously, in spite of all my gear getting man-handled and weather-exposed and less cared for probably more than it should have, my gun barrel, lock, etc. never got a spot of rust, even when left wet. [I carried my original, cut-down 1816 Harpers Ferry two weeks crossing the mountains and it rained/sleeted/snowed much of the time.] The bore stayed rust-free, even after shooting. I can only surmise that it was because I use linseed oil, which I reckon soaked into the iron and stayed. So, I see no reason to use new-fangled chemicals on my old-fangled guns, especially when the new stuff just doesn't do the job!
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Harrod
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Joined: 31 Jan 2008
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Location: Kentucky
Real Name: Tim Matherly

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2008 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ed... boiled linseed oil like from Lowe's? I've used that on my knife with good results.
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Ed...Maurer....
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 12:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes--boiled linseed oil, though 'natural' linseed oil would work as well.
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white savage
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Joined: 17 Aug 2009
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Real Name: Ben Miller

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I run a patch of Bear oil down mine

-Ben

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VtBlackdog
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2009 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

re: olive oil and linseed oil-

do you need to wipe it out before shooting?
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VtBlackdog
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 12:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

VtBlackdog wrote:
re: olive oil and linseed oil-

do you need to wipe it out before shooting?


anyone?
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Hiparoo
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Real Name: Mitch Post

PostPosted: Thu Sep 17, 2009 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

no

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stickbow
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Fri Nov 13, 2009 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's a good idea to wipe your bore before you load anyhow. Sometimes you find odd stuff down the barrel.

That's especially true on cannons -- it's called "searching the barrel", but any gun (muzzleloader, breechloader, whatever) can get junk down it in storage.
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Belleville
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Joined: 21 May 2007
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Location: Oyo
Real Name: Doc Shaffer

PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2016 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Preventing "After Cleaning" Rust

Have suffered with after cleaning rust for ever until recent years.

I stop up the touch hole with a round tooth pick (or equal). Then clean the bore with auto window washing fluid by pouring some down the barrel, wiping as clean as possible with rr w/ jag and cleaning patches. Then pour out any remaining fluid. Wipe dry with more patches. Then spray in some WD-40 and again wipe dry with more patches. Then wipe with patches sprayed with PB Blaster until all black reside is gone. Dry with more patches. Wipe the bore with plenty of Rig gun grease and a patch.

Leave the gun out to assure any moisture in bore is dry. Now this really seems to work. Only took 50 years to figure it out. But after a couple of weeks check bore with clean patch and reapply Rig as required.

PS: Drilled a very small hole from face of jag at an angle to come out on back side of jag to release suction pressure when cleaning w/auto windshield washer fluid.
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wattlebuster
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Real Name: Allen Reed

PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2016 7:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bear oil. 35 yrs zero problems

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