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A Fall & Winter Antihypertensive Tea

 
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Jason
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Joined: 14 May 2007
Posts: 579
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Jason W. Gatliff

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:36 pm    Post subject: A Fall & Winter Antihypertensive Tea Reply with quote

What if you or someone on a trek shows symptoms of high blood pressure, such as an aggrivating hypertensive headache. Look up! The Hawthorne tree is a spiny, somewhat thin and smallish tree, with finely lined greyish bark, which exhibits small, reddish, crabapple-like berries in the fall and winter. The berries can be chewed, eaten or made into a pleasant enough tea. It really works. Too much however will result in a next day "sleepy hangover" and you may end up sleeping the next morning away. Hawthorne berry has been used by Europeans (and Asians) for several hundred years at least for medicinal purposes.(Submitted for educational purposes.)

Submitted by: Michael Littlejohn - Mikeeebx@aol.com on January 25, 2002

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longwalker
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Joined: 09 Nov 2009
Posts: 18
Location: Arkansas
Real Name: Darrell Lynch

PostPosted: Sat Jun 12, 2010 10:06 pm    Post subject: hawthone trees Reply with quote

Dang! Where I was raised in Illinois, these were all over the place. My Grandpa called them red-haws. Been in Arkansas for nearly forty years, and have yet to find one here. May have to transplant one from up North. Thanks for the info.

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Newburghboy
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Joined: 05 Oct 2010
Posts: 104
Location: Brooklyn New York
Real Name: Michael Littlejohn

PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:45 pm    Post subject: And a followup to "The Hypertensive Trekker"... Reply with quote

You may also look down into grassy fields in Summertime, there you will see the common dandylion. If that high blood pressure continues to ruin your trip, pull up and eat a dandylion root. Though bitter, t is a mild diuretic which will cause you to pass urine and will help lower the salt content of your blood. Be sure to rehydrate with enough water. Between Dandylions and Hawthornes you should be very much restored (submitted for educational purposes only.)
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