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Tin Canteen Care

 
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Jason
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Joined: 14 May 2007
Posts: 579
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Jason W. Gatliff

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:35 pm    Post subject: Tin Canteen Care Reply with quote

About ten years ago I wrote a short piece for Muzzleloader on the care of tin canteens. I believe that enough time has pasted that I would pass that on again.

The biggest problem I have seen with tin canteens is not the construction or the material but the care given to it by it's owner. All to often people come home from an event or trek and toss their gear in the corner and donít give it a second thought for several days or longer. Unfortunately, for a tin canteen that can create a problem if any amount of water is left in it as it will rust. I have been using the same tin canteen for eight years and it still has many good years left by doing the following when returning from a trip.

Place the canteen upright in a bowl or jar that will allow the water to completely drain, you might also make a wick of a paper towel to aid in removing the moisture from the canteen. Let it sit for a day, then if you can remove the strap and stopper, place it in the stove for a little while with the temperature at a very low setting. You have to be very careful with the temperature so as not to melt the solder holding it together. The heat from the stove will remove all moisture remaining from the canteen.

For storage gently place the stopper in to keep little friends out but do not make it tight. Due to changing temperatures, the inside of the canteen will develop condensation if the stopper is tight, by it being loose it will allow the canteen to breath.

Yes, you can coat the inside with beeswax but that's another story.

Hope this helps.

Jim Kindred

Submitted by: Jim Kindred - kindred@ebicom.net on December 30, 2001

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