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Fire Starting Methods
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Jason
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Joined: 14 May 2007
Posts: 579
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Jason W. Gatliff

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 11:33 pm    Post subject: Fire Starting Methods Reply with quote

I use heavy canvas (jean cloth) for my char. I also have a candle ready when the tinder is damp. I scrape off some wax into the tinder which helps ignition (or use wax from drippings). Up here cottonwood bark is abundant, but I've also used dead palmetto in Florida (I presume dry Spanish Moss would work great).

After the tinder get's going on damp days, I use the candle to drip wax on the tinder. Pine leaves, cones, resin, and even live boughs can help you in a bind (don't cut live limbs unless really necessary). I've seen big pine cones emit a fiery roar when ignited.

I've made brimstone matches also, which involves dipping wood splints into melted sulphur. I put the stove element on it's lowest setting, and place powdered sulphur into a small container (glass will work). When the material melts, dip a splint a few times to adequately coat it. Powdered sulpher can be bought at most drug stores.

The brimestone match, safely tucked away, can then be touched to an ember on char to produce a flame. Don't forget the lock of your gun, which can be used to ignite char (make sure your weapon is unloaded and pointed in a safe direction).

Submitted by: M.H. Maggelet - mhmaggelet@hotmail.com on September 09, 2001

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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:04 am    Post subject: Fire lighting. Reply with quote

Someone else here getting confused with tinder and kindling. I have not caught a spark on wet tinder yet! Regards, Le Loup.
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dawnzky05
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 12:55 am    Post subject: On fire! Reply with quote

Wet tinder will never caught by fire. Kinfling is entirely different. A candle on your gear is very important especially when the tinder is damp.






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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Sun Jan 25, 2009 3:56 pm    Post subject: Re: On fire! Reply with quote

[quote="dawnzky05"]Wet tinder will never caught by fire. Kinfling is entirely different. A candle on your gear is very important especially when the tinder is damp.




Wet tinder will not catch a spark. If you are VERY CAREFUL, you can rub some black powder into the tinder with a pinch of dry gunpowder on top, and strike a spark on this. This is only in an emergency, and it will probably not take the first time, it has to dry out.
Carrying a candle stub is a very good idea, and I always carry one in my pouch. This is used when the tinder is DRY, but the KINDLING is wet. If you are using a tinderbox, then the fire lighting process is easier, and you do not waste tinder. You strike a spark onto the tinder, and blow it really hot, holding the candle stub up close to melt the wax/tallow until it drips onto the hot tinder. If the tinder catches fire, you can light the candle stub and place it in your fireplace under the damp kindling to dry it out, and eventually make fire.

Regards, Le Loup.
Primitive Fire Lighting-Flint and Steel by Keith H. Burgess.

Available from: http://livinghistorytraders.blogspot.com/ or
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com or BooBooks, Armidale, New England NSW Australia.
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VtBlackdog
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use a bow-drill; it took some time to get the hang of it, but now I like "playing the devils fiddle" better than flint/steel....I use Poplar for both drill and hearth.
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 3:19 pm    Post subject: The Fire-bow. Reply with quote

[quote="VtBlackdog"]I use a bow-drill; it took some time to get the hang of it, but now I like "playing the devils fiddle" better than flint/steel....I use Poplar for both drill and hearth.[/quote]

I agree, great fire lighting skill to learn and practice. I use Yacca for drill-bit and fireboard. There is a similar plant in the US called Yucca which is also used for fire-bow fire lighting.
Regards,Le Loup.
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white savage
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Joined: 17 Aug 2009
Posts: 28
Location: Fort Harrosin, Virginia (New Market Va.)
Real Name: Ben Miller

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For a birds nest I use that really thick, all-natural twine, frayed out. I use a fancey twisted back "C" striker. A piece of "shail" piece of flint (if you can get a hold of this stuff never let go). An old beet up bees wax candle.
And for char I use cotton/canvas frayed out. Anyone know what kind of fungus ya use for char up in western Virginia?

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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2009 6:07 pm    Post subject: Flint & Steel fire lighting/Tinder Fungus. Reply with quote

[quote="white savage"]For a birds nest I use that really thick, all-natural twine, frayed out. I use a fancey twisted back "C" striker. A piece of "shail" piece of flint (if you can get a hold of this stuff never let go). An old beet up bees wax candle.
And for char I use cotton/canvas frayed out. Anyone know what kind of fungus ya use for char up in western Virginia?[/quote]

That fire-steel sounds like the old early 18thc. English style striker.
Horse Hoof Fungus. Break off the outer layer and inside you will find what is known as Amadou. This is a soft material-like substance that was used for covering hats, drying fish hooks, and of course as tinder for fire lighting. Also known as Fomes Fomantarius.
Le Loup.
(Also at: http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com )

[img][URL=http://img6.imageshack.us/i/fomesfomantarius2.jpg/][IMG]http://img6.imageshack.us/img6/9849/fomesfomantarius2.th.jpg[/IMG][/URL][/img][/url]
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dnaw_4304
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Joined: 11 Feb 2010
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Real Name: Dustin Warren

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

is anyone familiar with what works best for tinder in Northern California?
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dnaw_4304
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Joined: 11 Feb 2010
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Real Name: Dustin Warren

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

is anyone familiar with what works best for tinder in Northern California?
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Le Loup
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:20 am    Post subject: California Tinders. Reply with quote

[quote="dnaw_4304"]is anyone familiar with what works best for tinder in Northern California?[/quote]

[b]I am not familier with California, but I would expect you to have cattail reeds there and most certainly punk wood.
Use the dry seed heads of the cattail, you will need to char them in the fire. Punk wood is the dry rotten wood often found in downed trees, sometimes in the limbs, but often in the base of the trunk where the roots are.
Regards, Le Loup[/b].
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badWind
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Fri Feb 12, 2010 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

depends on WHERE in No.Cal. if your up in the Mtns. punkwood, in the Valley, cattails and rotten cottonwood trees..
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markinmi
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Joined: 13 Feb 2009
Posts: 48

Real Name: mark drinkard

PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saw a great one on youtube under Rogers Rangers.So simple I never thought of it before.Make a rolled tube of birch bark and set your birds nest and char in the end ,strike directly into it and when it catches you almost have a torch in hand.Now that will take your kindling.
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Captain_Cogle
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Real Name: Chris Berry

PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 11:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You wont find birch bark in Northern California. Cedar bark is the stuff to use here. My friend who posted the question is in Shasta County.
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jbtusa
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Joined: 11 Mar 2009
Posts: 17
Location: Boise, Idaho
Real Name: John Todd

PostPosted: Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jason: I hate to rain on your fire parade, but the use of charcloth by the 1800's western fur trappers cannot be documented. However, the use of charred wood, charred punk and tinder fungus is documented. For a LONG discussion about this, see: http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fusionbb/showtopic.php?tid/236931/
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