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Broken wrist on a Brown Bess
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jeff42nd
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 8
Location: Michigan
Real Name: Jeff Katt

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 11:44 am    Post subject: Broken wrist on a Brown Bess Reply with quote

At an event last week I broke the wrist of my Brown Bess. I have one of those "India" Military Heritage Bess's. When I got this musket I took it apart and strip that God awful varnish and stain from the stock. I sanded the stock down to look like a Bess from the 1750's and then stained it walnut with boiled linseed oil. I then also replace that 15 pound steel ramrod with a hickory wooden ramrod. Many people really like the look of this musket, and I use this when I am following Howe's orders.

This is the second time that I am repairing the wrist, this time it broken in a different spot. Cheap arse wood!

I bought some brass from Track of Wolf, but I have a hard time trying to bend it around the stock to make a nice fit. The brass is 0.025 thick, I was figuring to get some thinner brass that I could work into place.

My question is.

"Has anyone had to wrap brass around their wrist, if so could you lend some information on the do's and don't of this type of repair."

What type of tacks or nails is PC?

I am just looking for some guidance.
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LRB
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Joined: 15 May 2007
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Real Name: WICK ELLERBE

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just my suggestion. Others will have other solutions. Epoxy the stock back together. remove the barrel, and drill a 1/2" hole from inside the breech, through the wrist well beyond the comb. Expoxy in a 1/2" dowell, or better yet, 1/2" thick walled steel tubeing, or anything 1/2" in diameter, strong, and preferably light weight. Then refinish the outside as best you can.
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Grenadier42
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good suggestion, Wick...or you could sew wet rawhide around the repair after the epoxy and allow it to dry rock hard...just a thought!
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Kasper Mansker
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 61
Location: Gallatin, TN
Real Name: Ehrin Ehlert

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 1:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Wick on this one...well almost. My suggestion would be to drill your holes for dowel before glueing the pieces back together. At least that is way my dad repaired my rifle when it broke my fall once.

But then again, Wick's idea is probably more simple, as you do not have to be concerned with the two holes lining up.

If you use a wooden dowel...make sure it is a hardwood.

E
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Fitzhugh Williams
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 393
Location: Greenville, SC
Real Name: Fitzhugh Williams

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with the dowel method. A 1/2" oak dowel is very strong. It should do the trick. Probably better than new.
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LRB
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Joined: 15 May 2007
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Real Name: WICK ELLERBE

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 4:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well Kasper, at least you fell and broke your own gun. That's better than what Jason did. I'm gunna hafta watch my gun around you guys. It was good seeing you and Beth at Bledsoe. Take care.
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captchee
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Joined: 07 Jun 2007
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Real Name: charles starks

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

if you dowel it , you will need to clamp it which will be difficult to do in the wrist .
I also wouldn’t use epoxy . Get you some Acraglas. This will make the repair stronger then the wood wood .
Before you drill for the dowel . Drill a smaller hole for a long wood screw in the same location . Apply the glass to both sides place them together and tighten the screw .
Now if you careful you can also color the glass so it matches the stock or grain in the stock with the dies that come in the Acra-Glas kit .
Once dry you can remover the screw/ bolt and re drill for a hard wood dowel OR just leave the screw in place .

If you go with the brass plate , you will need to anneal it first . Just get it good and red hot and let it cool . This will soften the brass so you can conform it properly.

the problem with these stock , while the wood can be soft , is most times that they do not cut the plank so the grain runs through the wrist . they simply lay out the paterns to get the most from every board . this isnt proper and is why most fail in the wrist
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Roy
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 6:42 pm    Post subject: Re: Broken wrist on a Brown Bess Reply with quote

jeff42nd wrote:


"Has anyone had to wrap brass around their wrist, if so could you lend some information on the do's and don't of this type of repair."

What type of tacks or nails is PC?

I am just looking for some guidance.


Yes I have... used thin .007 shim stock and used small steel square brads... think brad guns. Use Wicks repair and then this over the top

http://www.roystroh.com/IMG_2491.jpg

you need to anneal the brass to get it to bend properly.
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nwtradegun
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Joined: 09 Jul 2007
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Real Name: bob morrison

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 8:49 pm    Post subject: broken stock Reply with quote

if u opt for the rawhide rap ( would be correct for time and type of repair ) varnish or shellac the dry rawhide so it would get wet
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Mark Scott
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Real Name: Mark Scott

PostPosted: Thu Jun 05, 2008 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To anneal the brass, you need to heat it and then quench it, kind of works opposite of steel and iron. Mark
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
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Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

yes, dowl for strength since this is the second time.....

To clamp odd shaped items...I do this for my windsor chair seats if they split... You have to have parallel sides to clamp properly.
Take scrap wood (usually 2x4 stock) place it on either side of the item to be clamped.
ON the scrap, Scribe an equal distance line to either side of the clamped area.
Use a bansaw and cut out on the lines.
When placed back against the item to be clamped, it should be a fairly good fit.. adjust as necessary (consider padding with wool felt or lether scrap before clamping. Excess ooze will glue the padding to the surface, but you can easily take it off with cabinet scrapers.)
Finish as necessary to match rest of item..especially easy if you've used linseed or real shelac.

Let us know how it goes.

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captchee
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Real Name: charles starks

PostPosted: Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the problem here fellas , and maybe i am wrong but i have never seen one split down the center of the stock . thus you cant clamp from the side . your going to have to clamp from the barrel inlet to the butt plate . do to the drop in the stock this is difficult as most times stock shear , not break square.

thus the only way to clamp is to run a screw from the barrel channel down through the wrist thus through the break OR do the opposite as we do with broken shotgun wrists and drill a hole under the but plate all the way up through the wrist and out the barrel channel "NOT easy " then run a long bolt through this hole and put a nut on it .

Now there is another option but it doesnt always work and can result in damage to the stock if the stock is to soft . This involves opening up the tang screw hole through the stock . to ¼ inch . Cutting a 1/4 inch piano wire 6 inches long and notching both ends .
You then slide this through the enlarge hole . You then take a 10 inch Harwood 1x1 block and place it on the butt of the stock . You then run wire from one end of that block over and around the piano wire and back to the same end on the block .
Do this on the opposite side as well . You then twist the wires just as you would an old bow saw . But be careful . Both sides have to be twisted evenly or you will put more pressure on one side .
Watch the tang bolt hole as well because you can get this so tight that it will split the stock through the center
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Hawkeye
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Joined: 18 May 2007
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Location: Columbus, Ohio
Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2008 12:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How about clamping as I mentioned above above and below the problem in a good area....making sure the two final clamped are parallel to each other tang to but...

Then clamp the clamps to each other on either side?

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Lloyd Moler
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Joined: 16 May 2007
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Real Name: Lloyd Moler

PostPosted: Sat Jun 07, 2008 6:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't understand why everyone wants to make the job so difficult with all those clamps and stuff. Just use the screw as Captchee said and it will go fast and easy.

After the Acraglas sets, I remove the screw and drill for a fiberglass rod and then Acraglas that in. That is the only thing different that I do from Captchee. The reason I use a fiberglass rod is, it is easier to redrill any holes that will go through it than a steel rod. I had not thought of the steel tubing, but that would be a good idea too.

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Hawkeye
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Real Name: Darylee Foertsch

PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2008 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because I don't use fiberglass
I'm not sure anyone here does.

And....there are many different methods of clamping....I've often used ropes and sticks to hold tension on items...wet rawhide works well to hold tight after it dries...better than brass wire windings.

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