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Patch Material

 
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Adam Wetherington
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Joined: 29 Apr 2010
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Real Name: Adam Wetherington

PostPosted: Tue Mar 12, 2013 5:06 pm    Post subject: Patch Material Reply with quote

What kind of linen do you like for patch material? I am tired of buying the modern pre-cut patches and want to make my own. Should I be looking at lightweight, medium weight, heavy weight, etc. I guess it depends on how tght a combo I want but maybe there is more to it that I don't know. I've tried pillow ticking and have no complaints but it's all been cotton and I want to try some linen.
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LRB
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Joined: 15 May 2007
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Real Name: WICK ELLERBE

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 6:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cotten pillow ticking is much easier to obtain. Thickness is largely dependant on the depth of your grooves, and the ball size. You want the patch to make a good seal. This usually requires a patch slightly thicker than groove depth, and sometimes a good bit thicker if using a ball less than .010 smaller than bore size. Cotton, linen, which ever you choose needs a strong tight weave. They can be cut round or square, even octagon, or cut at the muzzle. I believe most period patches were pre-cut squares, and often pre-lubed. I find round patches easier and faster to cut out using a drill press with a modified hole saw blade. One can cut 8 patches per stroke using the press and the material folded 3 times, and make a few hundred in pretty short time. To do this easily, you need a board to set the cloth on, then another over and on the cloth, with a hole in it larger than the saw blade. The board over the cloth keeps it from shifting when you cut.
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Adam Wetherington
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Real Name: Adam Wetherington

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the help.

I guess I probably should have worded my question different. I'm used to using cotton patches. I've been using them for years so that's what I understand. I know in my head what cotton pillow ticking looks and feels and shoots like. But I have NEVER used linen and can't make the same mental connection right now. So when I look at different types (online) I see them listed as lightweight, medium, etc....do these reference the thickness? The weave? Something else?

Thanks again.
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LRB
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Real Name: WICK ELLERBE

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As best I know, it will be a combination of thickness and tightness of weave. Both contribute to the weight. You need a source that will supply you with samples.
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Lyndon
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Joined: 22 May 2007
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Location: Tuolumne River, Ca.
Real Name: Lyndon Landes

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I go to the fabric store and buy a yard 100% cotton. If you want to get real exact on the thickness bring your calipers with you to mic it but you'll probably probably get some funny looks. I cut some into strips and tie a strip to the strap on my shooting pouch and keep the rest handy for rags, more patch material and whatnot. That is more or less as a back up unless I am doing a lot of shooting since I typically load from a loading block (GASP!).
Like Wick said, loading with precut patches will be faster, and you won't need to carry a patch knife or use your belt knife to cut the access after starting a ball. I started using strips of patch material several years ago and it seems to work pretty well for me.
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Mario
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Location: Mohawk Valley, NY
Real Name: Mario Doreste

PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Adam Wetherington wrote:
What kind of linen do you like for patch material? I've tried pillow ticking and have no complaints but it's all been cotton and I want to try some linen.



Lyndon wrote:
I go to the fabric store and buy a yard 100% cotton.


Just sayin'...

Adam, most fabric stores carry linen in spring. At least the chains around here do.

Take your calipers with you.

Personally, I am of the opinion that you shouldn't have to hammer a PRB down the barrel or use a short starter, so either use thinner linen or smaller ball to keep it snug but not overly so.

Issac Weld wrote in 1799 about using a "...bit of linen rag...", BTW.

Mario

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Lyndon
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My deepest most humble apologies, Guess I missed that part of the second post.

Lyndon
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Adam Wetherington
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Joined: 29 Apr 2010
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Real Name: Adam Wetherington

PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 7:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No worries, Lyndon. I appreciate you just trying to help me.

I ended up taking the micrometer with me and got some more tried and true ticking as well as the tightest weave Linen they had. It turned out to be .015 so I'll give it a shot (pun intended, lol) and see what happens.
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CT03
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Real Name: Christopher Treichel

PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First you have to try and find what kind of patch/ball combo your gun likes. I had a Dixie Tennesse that was a tack driver with .495 and shirt cotton but I couldn't hit the broad side of a barn with .490 and ticking.

My current rifle has a getz .54 barrel which like .530 and thick linnen which I just use scraps from sewing breeches.

I cut strips about an inch and a half or so wide and hang them from the buckle on my bag... Grease it up before I head out and cut as I go.

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Adam Wetherington
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Real Name: Adam Wetherington

PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CT03 wrote:
First you have to try and find what kind of patch/ball combo your gun likes.


Yes, I know. This isn't my first rodeo. I have been shooting muzzleloaders for over 15 years. I know what patch ball combo my guns like. I was simply trying to ask if there was a certain TYPE of linen I should look for or avoid when wanting to make patches out of them.
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CT03
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Real Name: Christopher Treichel

PostPosted: Sat Mar 16, 2013 10:59 pm    Post subject: Re: Patch Material Reply with quote

Adam Wetherington wrote:
Should I be looking at lightweight, medium weight, heavy weight, etc.


My misunderstanding of your statement...
Usually weight of cloth refers to how thick it is... Linen comes in the same thicknesses as cotton. From ultrafine hankerchief to canvas and sail cloth weights. Its use is also no different. So same as other cloths you'll have to experiement... but if you already have a patch ball combo then as you said just go with a micrometer to the fabric store... Might contact some of the sutlers that make clothes and ask them for certain thickness linen scraps probably at a better price.

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Adam Wetherington
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Real Name: Adam Wetherington

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

10-4! Great explanation. Thanks.

I went the other day and got the only linen they had in the same thickness as my usual patches. I hope to have some range time here in the coming weeks.

Thanks everyone for the help!
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Mike/MO
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Real Name: Michael Petersmeyer

PostPosted: Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

When it comes to linen, first be sure the fabric is 100% flax linen. Beware of blends that include polyester. Then its the same exercise if looking through the fabric to see if the weave is tight or loose. Measre for the same thickness you use in cotton patching. I have rifle that would tear cotton patching to fluff linen patching was the only material that held together.

Patch changes will put you back at the start of load development for your rifle.

Good luck with your yard of linen.

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CT03
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Real Name: Christopher Treichel

PostPosted: Mon Mar 18, 2013 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike, that is a great point... anytime you try new cloth always do a burn test.

Cotton and Linnen will burn then crumble to an ash.

If there is any plastic in it at all it will burn fast and melt.

google fabric burn tests any will find all kinds of charts also good for figuring out if you have 100% wool

http://www.ditzyprints.com/dpburnchart.html

Any fabric store will alsways be happy to give you a 1 inch or so sample of the cloth... just walk outside and pull out your matches or bic and light it up. If they refuse just sneak a few threads and do the same.

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