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Waist coats

 
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Sat Mar 26, 2011 5:17 am    Post subject: Waist coats Reply with quote

Hi All
I'm slowly bashing on with the costume and picked up a copy of the Reconstructing History early 18th C waistcoat pattern.

Since I've not made a waistcoat before I decided to make a trial job out of some material laying about the house. The lining is unbleached irish linen I got cheep from a place in Manchester and the outside is made from a piece of 60 x 55 inch 100% wool, probably incredibly non period but cost 1.50 in a charity shop a couple of years back.





Today I'll start on all those button holes. its completely hand sewn and took about a weeks of evenings to get this far.

Anyroad, I am now looking for a source of correct period wool to make a best version from, ideally in a mid to light olive natural dye. I've had no joy looking on the net so can anyone suggest a source please?

The weather is picking up in the UK now so I may be venturing out in some of this kit soon.

ATB

Tom
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more thing
as you can see i made the practice waistcoat in the modern "sew the lining on and turn right side out" method, partly for speed but mainly as I found the instructions for doing it the period way total gobbledegook. Does any one have photos of a finished piece or ideally a illustrated idiots guide to attaching a lining in the period fashion, please?

No hurry on this one as I need to source the right wool still and lose some of the winter lard, also I've started on some single layer summer linen breeches.

ATB

Tom
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 4:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even though it shouldn't have been possible wih my current girth and the nominal size of the pattern i tried slipping on the test waistcoat and by some minor miracle i got it on, which bodes well for when i have (a) lost weight and (b) sourced the wool broad cloth for the outer of the period correct one.



just don't ask me to bend or breath out!

I will deinately be buying in pewter buttons for the best version as I do not like the cloth covered wooden disk jobs at all.

ATB

Tom
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D.S. Bradshaw
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Joined: 19 Apr 2009
Posts: 208
Location: Middle Waters, USA
Real Name: D. Scott Bradshaw

PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2011 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You've done a fine job of it sir! Not being an expert by any stretch of imagination I say that I can see nothing wrong with this one at all. Well done and wear it with all pride in having done this yourself and by hand.
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks! I'm still looking around for pics of a waist coat or jackets lining done in the correct period way as despite certain kind folks attempts to explain it to me I still can't get my head around it.

Cheers!

Tom
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Mate, Open up the back seam a bit, and install lacing. It was done as folks weight varied lots during a year for some classes of folks.

LD

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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2011 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A great idea LD but at the moment It's given me some extra motivation for losing weight.

One thing, I've just got a copy of "Dress of the people" by John Styles on interlibrary loan and on a quick flick through the fabric the trial job is made from is well within the bounds of what they could make back in the mid 18th although its possibly a bit high end for the social level I am aiming for. Still, second hand and stolen clothes where commonly worn by the working man.

I'm bashing on with the single layer breeches, Irish linen again. Just rewceived the bone buttons herself ordered so i will do the holes now.



I've done the eyeles and tape at the back since and once the tops finished I will fit the lower legs properly, currently the inside leg seem is only back stitched mear the crotch and just basted below.

ATb

Tom
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 5:42 pm    Post subject: Finished the summer breeches Reply with quote

Hi All
I've just finished the summer weight linen breeches I maentioned above



and I am rather happy with the results. Adding a extra thee inches (1.5 when folded) and the hessian interlining to the waist belt of the Reconstructing History patterm has really improved the cut/fit on a fatso like me. No braces or belt required to keep this pair up which weigh less than half what the lined pair did. I deliberately left out the side pockets so i won't be able to cram stuff in them to increase the downward inclination of this pair.

If a clumsy ape like creature can make a half decent fist of them anybody can!

ATB



PS Went to the Helmshore Textile Museum today and was admiring all the 18th C spining and weaving kit there. The water wheel and fulling gear date from the 1840s as these things did wear out but watching them in action was as near to seeing a mid 18th C mill in action as I'm likely to get.
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ColonialCurt
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Joined: 05 Jul 2010
Posts: 10
Location: Orange County, CA
Real Name: Curtis Keller

PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 1:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks really good Tom. I'm about to start my own breeches and waistcoat project and have been thoroughly enjoying this thread. Thanks for posting the pictures, descriptions, and updates. I'm sure I'll have some questions for ya soon!
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tombear
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Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Wed Apr 13, 2011 2:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cheers! My main advice would be start off with a unlined pair made out of cheep stuff. I made this one first



unbleached hemp russian drill on the outside, unbleached flax linen on the inside, the former is horrible stuff to sew, frays as you look at it!. It came out OK in the end but on my rotund form has a tendency to fall down. I had to resort to making up braces which were just about being introduced for the rich in France then Britain so they could undo their breeches during the epic meals that beccame fashionable in the mid to late 18th century. I couldn't find any pics of early examples and few details apart from French ones were tied on with ribbons and British ones buttoned on the inside of the waistband. The shape i lifted from those on lederhosen which predate the 18th C.

If I can help in anyway just ask.

ATB

Tom
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Doug R.
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Joined: 22 Mar 2010
Posts: 247
Location: Anchor Point, Alaska
Real Name: Doug Ruzicka

PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 11:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tom,
Do have any knowledge of braces being used in colonial New England in the mid-late 1700's? Did the fashion make its way over here?
Thanks.

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tombear
User


Joined: 21 Jan 2011
Posts: 18
Location: Rossendale Valley Lancashire
Real Name: Tom Ready

PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2011 3:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HI Doug
no information on a earliest date in New England but looking into when earliest examples in UK were as I can access collections over here more easily. More on this when I have something definate.

ATB

Tom
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Doug R.
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Joined: 22 Mar 2010
Posts: 247
Location: Anchor Point, Alaska
Real Name: Doug Ruzicka

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Did a little research and discovered that Ben Franklin designed some H style braces for the Philadelphia fire dept and wore them himself in 1736. Looking for more info...

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