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2010 Garden Journal
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Larry IB
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Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Mobile,Alabama
Real Name: Larry Hataway

PostPosted: Sat Apr 24, 2010 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

By the way Jim you are an inspiration to try and garden the old way and you to Isaac. keep posting with your progress.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed May 05, 2010 7:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Larry. Been too busy to post the past few days, but the garden's progressing nicely, what with all the rain. I'll post an update soon.


Last edited by Jim Jacobs on Sat May 08, 2010 7:57 am; edited 1 time in total
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat May 08, 2010 7:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This morning I awoke to cool temperatures and high winds, come in on the heals of a few hard rains. It looks like a good time to post an update.

Over the past couple weeks I've begun to enjoy fresh greens from the garden, always welcome fare at this time of year, generally including a mix of arugula, turnip greens and the ever-present and uninvited lambs quarters. The lambs quarters are there, they've got to come out of the garden anyway, they might as well go in the pot by way of compensation for the added labour they create. In any event, I've greatly enjoyed my greens.

As of last Sunday evening all I'd planted to that point was up and doing well for most part, including some of the potatoes as well as the corn, Moon and Stars melons, pickling cucumbers, Brown Spanish onions, Tennis Ball lettuce, Roquet Arugula, Purple White Top turnips and Purple Olive radishes. The broccoli starts and St. Hubert peas I planted 3 weeks ago are beginning to reach a considerable height, as are the seed onions and garlic I transplanted last Fall. Not up as of yesterday are the West India Gherkins, planted almost two weeks ago, but this is no cause for concern at this point given the slowness with which this vegetable germinates.

Over the course of this past week I went through and replanted where the vegetables for whatever reason failed to germinate, and of course I've begun the endless task of weeding and hoeing. Of particular note was the lettuce, most of which failed to germinate in the row I planted it in, though I've got a good healthy crop of fugitive lettuce growing elsewhere in the vicinity. Apparently the dry, sandy soil I covered the seed with wasn't sufficient to hold it in place against the winds we've been having. It also appears that I'll be needing to go through and replant some of the potatoes over the coming week, the seed stock coming from last years crop which has begun to put forth more numerous and vigorous eyes than I found on the stock purchased from the nursery for planting.

Last evening I put everything else in, save the beans and gourd starts, including the Orinoco Tobacco starts (backed with a planting of seed, just in case), seed of Boston Marrow Squash and Connecticut Field Pumpkins, and the starts of Jefferson Big Red Tomatoes and Jefferson/McMahon Bird Peppers.

When planting a Three Sisters patch it's essential to give the corn a good start ahead of the beans and squash, with the corn seedlings being on the order of 4" high or better, and I won't be planting the Gourd starts for another week to give the corn a better lead, and instead will be planting the beans in that section of the patch next. While native lore lists Squash as the Second Sister, all of the instructions I've read coming from modern sources say to plant your beans second, but because beans tend to be much faster and more aggressive in their germination and growth habit I've found that when planting strictly from seed you're best off to plant the squash second. When planting squash starts though it's best to plant them last.

This weekend I decide to do my period gardening in period garb, which last evening lead to a few honking car horns and an "educational session" with my next door neighbor. Ah, the country life. Nevertheless, I'm sitting here typing in full 18th century agrarian splendor, ready to head out into the blustery conditions to do my hoeing, and put on some honest patina.
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Jim Jacobs
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PostPosted: Sun May 09, 2010 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Apparently we didn't get the frost expected this morning, though at 4 a.m. the temperature was 38 degrees. Everything survived well except most of the Orinoco Tobacco. Glad I planted the seed for back up.

Spent the early afternoon weeding the strawberry patch and arranging the plant runners for propogation.

All else is cultivated and weeded for the time being. I'll be doing another round of replanting this week, otherwise it's time to turn to on yard cleanup and finishing up a woodworking project I started for a friend a couple of weeks ago, as well as finishing the pirogue I built for my scout in March and the Punt I started last Fall. Soon I'll be regularly enjoying a good 18th c. home-grown and hand-caught diet, the benefits of which greatly exceed the labor expended.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon May 10, 2010 8:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Spread half of last year's compost. Turned the new compost.
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Larry IB
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Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Mobile,Alabama
Real Name: Larry Hataway

PostPosted: Tue May 11, 2010 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We put 40 blueberry bushes in the ground.Staked my tomatoes got some with golf ball size maters on them. Started putting up a fence to keep the deer clan out.Does anyone know where I can get goosefoot seeds, very interesting plant think i will plant it as a backup to hard times. I now it is wild but have heard one kind is still raised and domisticated.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu May 13, 2010 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

40 blueberry bushes, holy cow. You starting a you-pick blueberry farm, Larry? Hope they do well for you. Goosefoot.... amaranth? You're right, it does grow wild, all over the place around here. I usually "harvest" my share of it out of my garden area. It seems like I've seen the seed in one of our better local garden shops. I'll check. And Seedsavers might have it.... www.seedsavers.org .


Garden Journal.....
A couple of days of heavy rain have come at the right time for most of my starts and replanted seed. Now if we could just get some seasonable warm temperatures we'd be set.

This morning I planted the gourd starts. This evening I'll be going through and replanting bare spots in the potato patch. I won't have as much to replant there as first thought, just had some late bloomers. But it does look like I'll have to do a complete replanting of the West India Gherkins. Orinoco tobacco.... of roughly 50 plants put out, 2 have survived. All else is on track.
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Larry IB
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Joined: 19 Dec 2009
Posts: 5
Location: Mobile,Alabama
Real Name: Larry Hataway

PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Naa we are planting just for family. We pick each year at a farm that has 23 acres in berry bushes he charges 6 dollars a gallon. So pa inlaw got a deal on some bushes for our place. I did find some wild goosefoot are as some call it pigweed. I have been hoeing it up now I am letting it
grow with the rest of the garden. Been clearing out for a new garden shed/ blacksmith shop. I am going to try my hand at making a eye hoe. I can make hatchets and axes so an eye hoe or what we called a scoville hoe in the hardware business should not be to much trouble. With a large eye hoe you can sure clear some land if you have a good ash handle. Going to take a break this weekend from hoeing though I was walking around the ponds and I smelled a nice bream bed near the edge hope to be eating some bluegills for supper Saturday. Take care all
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