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Akansa (Quapaw)

 
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Morgan
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 184
Location: Arkansas
Real Name: Morgan Hodkin

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 10:28 am    Post subject: Akansa (Quapaw) Reply with quote

Have any of you done research on this tribe? I am finding mention of them in early French exploration, but very little detail.

Maybe I'm looking in the wrong places. Any suggestions or information will be greatly appreciated!

Morgan

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Okwaho
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Joined: 16 May 2007
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Real Name: Tom Patton

PostPosted: Mon May 21, 2007 11:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You might want to look at "The Indians of the Southeastern United States" by John R. Swanton . which has a tremendous amount of material on the Quapaws. This is the Bible on Southeastern Indians although occasionally I like to double check the references.Another excellent book is " "Southeastern Indians" by Charles Hudson but it has very little on the Quapaws.These are the two standard sources on Southeastern Indians. Both are,I believe, still in print but Swanton is by far the best especially on the tribe in which you're interested.
Tom Patton
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Morgan
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Real Name: Morgan Hodkin

PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 6:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks!

The state library has a copy of the Swanton book....I'll be making a trip there at my earliest convienence.

Always good to hear from a Mohawk elder.

Morgan

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R. Blanchard
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Joined: 15 May 2007
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Location: Northern Illinois
Real Name: Robert Blanchard

PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 9:22 am    Post subject: Quapaw Reply with quote

Here is a little something. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/tribes/quapaw/quapawhist.htm
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La Chance
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Joined: 06 Jul 2007
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Location: Kansas City
Real Name: Paul Clark

PostPosted: Mon Jul 09, 2007 2:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A.P. Nasatir's Before Lewis and Clark and Willard H. Rollings The Osage, An Ethnohistorical Study of Hegemony on the Prairie-Plains both have some information on the Quapaw, but it's pretty basic stuff. There may be some good references listed though.

I've been doing quite a bit of research on their Dhegian cousins, the Kansa, and have found that there are quite a few cultural similarities that can be found among all of the Dhegian tribes. Unfortunatly, it seems that the Osage and the Omaha are the only two that a lot of information has been written on, but sometimes you can find some little gems about the Kansa, Quapaw, and Ponca in those writings.

Francis LaFleche's writings on the Omaha and Osage might be good starting points, and you might be able to find some information in any French documents regarding the Arkansas Post. Just some thoughts, anyway.

Good luck on your research and if I find anything specific to the Quapaw I'll let you know.

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Mountain Gummer
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 11:26 am    Post subject: Quapaw/ Arkansaw Reply with quote

You could try NPS "Arkansas Post". It was an out post of the French, then the Spanish, and finaly was turned over to the US.

It was used as a trading post and mission to the Arkansas Indians.

My two bits,

Mt. Gummer
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Jacques
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Joined: 06 Jul 2008
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Real Name: David MacDonald

PostPosted: Sat Apr 11, 2009 1:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try Bossu's, Travels Through that Part of North American Called Louisiana, published about 1765, as I remember. A contemporary English translation of the French original is available on Google Book Search in PDF format. Bossu, who is a bit of braggart, had some considerable interaction with this tribe, claims to have been adopted into it and tatooed by them.[/i]
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BearCreek Ben
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Morgan:
There is apparently a "new" museum in Bentonville, called the Museum of Native American artifacts. They have some Quapaw pottery there. I'm going to check it out on Friday. Here's the website: http://museumofnativeamericanartifacts.org
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BearCreek Ben
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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just ran across this: The Quapaw Indians: A History of the Downstream People, by W. David Baird
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Le Nez
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Joined: 18 Aug 2009
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Location: Tejas
Real Name: Bob Norment

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are some good references in William Foster's translation of Henri Joutel's journal and also in Robert Weddle's "The Wreck of La Belle, The Ruin of La Salle".

Once the survivors of the ill-fated La Salle expedition to Texas made it to de Tonti's "Arkansas Post" among the Quapaws, they felt they were almost home. Severel good contemporary references on these people in both of these texts.


Another exceptional book that has some good Quapaw references is Judge Morris Arnold's "Colonial Arkansas 1686-1804 A Social and Cultural History". Also a good reference for French and Spanish infomation in this area!

Le Nez

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Crooked River
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Joined: 12 Dec 2009
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Location: Florida
Real Name: Brent O. Baldwin

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 9:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here is a book that may be informative: The Rumble of a Distant Drum: The Quapaws and Old World Newcomers, 1673-1804. This is from Eastern National, the "bookstore" for the National Park Service. I think the book is $35.00. You might find it cheaper at Amazon, but Eastern National is a pretty good outfit with which to deal.

Crooked River
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Joseph LaFlesche
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Joined: 09 Feb 2010
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Real Name: Charles Farley

PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2010 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

La Chance wrote:

Francis LaFleche's writings on the Omaha and Osage might be good starting points, and you might be able to find some information in any French documents regarding the Arkansas Post. Just some thoughts, anyway.


La Chance, I'd be interested to know anything on your reserch on Francis LaFlesche and the Omaha Tribe. Francis was my Great Uncle. My Great Grandmother was Rosalie LaFlesche Farley, thus making Joseph LaFlesche (Iron Eye) my Great, Great Grandfather. In the book, Iron Eye's Family: The Children of Joseph LaFlesche by Norma Kidd Green, I believe there is referance as to Joseph, Susette and John Webster going to the Indian Territory to help with the translation to Chief Standing Bear (a Ponca Chief) shortly after his trial. Also in the preface of the book are a few names that may be reserched. Joseph LaFlesche's father was a French trader and that is where Joseph got his "White Man's Name".

Sorry I got off thread there.

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La Chance
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Real Name: Paul Clark

PostPosted: Thu Mar 25, 2010 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Joseph,

The main thrust of my research is on the Kansa and Osage tribes, but I have collected little pieces about the other Dthegian tribes as well.

The only Francis LeFleche book I own is "The Osage and the Invisible World" and it strictly Osage. I know he wrote quite a few books on the Omaha as well.

Sorry I can't be more help.

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La Chance
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