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seed saving/seed sources

 
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 2:12 pm    Post subject: seed saving/seed sources Reply with quote

How many of you save seeds? Who do you use for your supply? It would be nice to start a list of people who save seeds and what they have.

We have turned our seed saving passion into a self supporting entity:
www.vnsseed.com (yes, the web site needs updating... although prices will remain the same for 2010). We are always looking to add to our network of historical seed savers. What says you?
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Isaac
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Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 289
Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 4:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We save our own. For purchases of new things we have generally gone with SeedSavers or Baker's Creek, but I have purchased from a few other sellers when certain varieties were needed.

IW

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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 3:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Seed for the few non-heirlooms I still plant get bought every year, but with the heirlooms I save my own for the most part. I've also traded with other heirloom gardeners or have been gifted with seed. When I want to try something new I go to Seedsaver's Exchange.... www.seedsavers.org .... If they don't have what I'm looking for in their catalog, I'll take a out a membership and tap into the network in their yearbook. IMHO this is the best route to go.

Interesting side note.... I'm finding out the buzz that I've enjoyed with other seed savers the past few years, observing and discussing the crops and trading seed, was also prevalent and widely enjoyed by "curious" gardeners in the 18th century.
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Jacobs wrote:
Seed for the few non-heirlooms I still plant get bought every year, but with the heirlooms I save my own for the most part. I've also traded with other heirloom gardeners or have been gifted with seed. When I want to try something new I go to Seedsaver's Exchange.... www.seedsavers.org .... If they don't have what I'm looking for in their catalog, I'll take a out a membership and tap into the network in their yearbook. IMHO this is the best route to go.

Interesting side note.... I'm finding out the buzz that I've enjoyed with other seed savers the past few years, observing and discussing the crops and trading seed, was also prevalent and widely enjoyed by "curious" gardeners in the 18th century.

Jim,
I am a member of Seed Savers as well, and while I agree it's a great resource, I thought it would be cool to start a network of "historical seed savers". We could trade for seed that has been researched to 18th century, maybe set up "want" lists, etc. Just a thought.
As for the side note, I have found that there were some who took up gardening as a hobby, planting "exotic" plants. As well as exotic fowl for that matter.... Jefferson had silkie chickens!

BTW - I can sell Seed Savers seeds, I sell the 2.75 packets for 2.00, if any one is interested. I am placing my first winter order tonite.
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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

About the only thing I saw in the catalog this year that I want right now is a packet of Boston Marrow Squash, pg. 40, item #1433 OG, 1 packet will do, and 1 packet of Red Fig Tomatos, pg. 61, item # 1235 OG. If it's not too late please order me these and just forward them to me 1st Class in a standard envelope. Anything else I want isn't in their catalog.

As to the exchange you're talking about, absolutely. At the moment I'm looking for the following;

-Peas (Dit?)

-Broccoli

-Carrots

-Skirrets

-Turnips

-Spinach

-True, non-hybridized Jacob's Cattle Beans

-Apple Trees, specifically Codlin, Redstreak, Aesopus Spitzenburg, Newton Pippen. (Scions will do.)

-Plum Trees, specifically Native American

All of the above dating pre-1800, the earlier the better. I'm also interested in seeing what's available in other vegetables and fruit from that period, and period Tobaccos.


At the moment none of my seed is cleaned, but I can offer the following;

Blue Lenape Flint Corn
Blue Shakomaxin (Lenape) Pole Beans
Jefferson Large Red Tomatos
Jefferson/McMahon's Bird Peppers
Tennis Ball Lettuce
West India Gherkins
Birdhouse Gourds
Mohawk Tobacco

Terms? I think $2.50 a packet postage paid is reasonable, price waived on trades, packet for packet. Payment is appreciated by way of defraying the costs, but I'll not turn another "curious gardener" away for lack of funds.


Quote:
As for the side note, I have found that there were some who took up gardening as a hobby, planting "exotic" plants. As well as exotic fowl for that matter.... Jefferson had silkie chickens!

From what I've been reading in Leighton's books it was a pretty darned big "hobby", being that virtually everything discovered in the new world was an exotic. It may have been a hobby to nobles and country gentlemen, but it was one tied to some pretty serious science, and from what I'm gathering their passion for this "hobby" wasn't unlike our passion for ours. What I find interesting is that I'm seeing a parallel in what we're doing, with the 17th and 18th century "curiousity" about these new and exotic plants and revolutionary new ideas and discoveries in husbandry and horticulture. Our correspondence in this thread concerning your idea for an exchange is pretty much identical to the 17th and 18th century correspondence I've seen in Leighton's books. (Hey now, effortless first person interpretation?) Maybe the parallel in mindset stems from the fact that these old plants and livestock, as well as the study of how to tend them, are as exotic and new to us as they were to the gardeners and farmers of the 17th and 18th centuries.

Yeah, this branch of living history is certainly very complete, in terms of offering rewards in both material culture and the study of period mindset.
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2010 8:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim,
I have added those items to my order and will send them to you when they come in. I would be interested in the Mohawk Tobacco. I am doing a VA tobacco this year, so no rush. I wonder how many on this board would be interested in a "Historical Seed Train"? It's alot of fun, I have done non historical ones. Basically everyone wanting to get involved "signs up" up until a deadline, then everyone sends a packet or two (whatever is decided) to the person assigned to them. What do you think, maybe a sticky?
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Isaac
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Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 289
Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim... I have wild plum trees if that is what you want. They are a bit big for digging though ;-) Have a back hoe?

Seriously though... I will have to look through what I have to list, but I do have some tobacco that you may be interested in... Tobac Hobourg. It is a tobacum from Quebec and is supposed to be one of two tobaccos that had been grown in that village since the 18th century. I also have an Ojibwe strain of rustica. Also, if Tharp can't hook you up with soup peas... I have some of the same stuff (he got his from me originally).

Ike[/i]

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We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.
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Loyalist Dave
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Joined: 21 Aug 2008
Posts: 294

Real Name: David Woolsey

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to do square-foot-gardening as my yard is very small, but I bought an end-unit townhome as there was enough room to grow some stuff.

Zuccini and yellow squash are with the flowers in the wife's flower bed (they make great shrubs to offset the flowers folks!)
Pickling cucumbers
Yellow pear tomatoes
cherry Tomatoes
Bell Peppers
tobasco peppers
peprocini peppers
Thai ornamental peppers
bush string beans (lots of 'em)

And I am trying to use last years seeds by saving them so will not know if it worked until a few months from now.

LD

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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Jan 14, 2010 6:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

carlilex wrote:
Jim,
I have added those items to my order and will send them to you when they come in. I would be interested in the Mohawk Tobacco. I am doing a VA tobacco this year, so no rush. I wonder how many on this board would be interested in a "Historical Seed Train"? It's alot of fun, I have done non historical ones. Basically everyone wanting to get involved "signs up" up until a deadline, then everyone sends a packet or two (whatever is decided) to the person assigned to them. What do you think, maybe a sticky?

Mohawk tobacco it is, Dave. Just email me your address... bluheron48@comcast.net ... and I'll send you some.

As to the seed train, yeah, I think that would be fun.


Isaac wrote:
Jim... I have wild plum trees if that is what you want. They are a bit big for digging though ;-) Have a back hoe?

Seriously though... I will have to look through what I have to list, but I do have some tobacco that you may be interested in... Tobac Hobourg. It is a tobacum from Quebec and is supposed to be one of two tobaccos that had been grown in that village since the 18th century. I also have an Ojibwe strain of rustica. Also, if Tharp can't hook you up with soup peas... I have some of the same stuff (he got his from me originally).

Ike[/i]

I'd be interested in having seed for both tobaccos Isaac, and some of the peas. I only managed to eat one mess from the seed Dit gave me last year, the rabbits got the rest.

As to your plum trees, are these a native strain or a European strain growing wild?
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Isaac
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Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 289
Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 8:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Jacobs wrote:
I'd be interested in having seed for both tobaccos Isaac, and some of the peas. I only managed to eat one mess from the seed Dit gave me last year, the rabbits got the rest.

As to your plum trees, are these a native strain or a European strain growing wild?


I will package the 2 tobaccos and some peas up for you and send them out. Email me your postal address and I will send it out tomorrow or Mon. IsaacWalters@gmail.com

Plums... I am quite certain that these are native wild plums. We had some of these in the woods on the back of the farm growing up and at our current place, we have a few down in the valley and back on the farm. The plums are about an inch in diameter (some get bigger) and the skins are quite tart (inside meat is very sweet though). I always go and pick a bunch the end of summer and fall... have even thought of making wine. I am not sure how easy I could locate young ones coming up, especially in spring, or I would dig and send some like I did the apple trees.

IW

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We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.
Aldo Leopold
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carlilex
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 11:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Jacobs wrote:

As to the seed train, yeah, I think that would be fun.




Let me put together the rules and post something this weekend.

Dave
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ditmurier
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 88

Real Name: Mike Tharp

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Uhh, Yea! Day late and dollar short here? Jim , Deer hit my peas hard this year so , I am short on peas but have tabac? I would be interested in the accessing more seeds?
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Rod L
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 226
Location: the Forks of the Yellowstone and Missouri
Real Name: Rod Lassey

PostPosted: Fri Jan 15, 2010 7:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Year before last was pretty much a complete bust for me, because of the weather--this year, the spring was so late I didn't even plant. Maybe better luck this spring. Anyway, here's the list of what I have. I'm always interested in trading for other Upper Missouri appropriate seeds.

Mandan red sweet corn
Mandan yellow flour corn
Mandan red corn
Mandan blue flour corn
Hidatsa red corn
Hidatsa yellow flour corn
Hidatsa white flint corn
Assiniboinne flint corn (AKA Ree corn)
Sioux little blue corn
Arickara society corn

Mandan striped squash
Hidatsa squash
Arickara squash

Omaha pumpkin

Mandan yellow beans
Hidatsa red beans
Arickara figue shield beans

Hidatsa sunflower
Mandan sunflower (from the Moves Slowly medicine bundle)

Arickara watermelon

Hidatsa tobacco (N. quadrivalvis)
Crow tobacco (N. quadrivalvis var. miltivalvis)

Rod

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Jim Jacobs
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll check it out Dave. Your tobacco seed and pods are in the mail. I only had a plastic bag to send them in, so you'll want to open it immediately when it arrives, let them air so they don't mold.

Great collection Rod, all specific to your region.

Looks like Isaac has me covered with the peas, Dit. We'll see if we can't guard them a little better this year.


Isaac wrote:
I will package the 2 tobaccos and some peas up for you and send them out. Email me your postal address and I will send it out tomorrow or Mon. IsaacWalters@gmail.com

Plums... I am quite certain that these are native wild plums. We had some of these in the woods on the back of the farm growing up and at our current place, we have a few down in the valley and back on the farm. The plums are about an inch in diameter (some get bigger) and the skins are quite tart (inside meat is very sweet though). I always go and pick a bunch the end of summer and fall... have even thought of making wine. I am not sure how easy I could locate young ones coming up, especially in spring, or I would dig and send some like I did the apple trees.

IW

Isaac, I'll send you an email directly. I'd be tempted to ask the favor of sending me some plum scions, but from what I've been reading the last couple days grafting is an iffy proposition with wild plums. I guess they're also prone to sending up suckers and will turn into a thicket if you don't stay on top of them. That wouldn't work for me. Oh well. I think I'm going to end up planting a European Green Gage instead. If it's not a whole lot of trouble though could you pick me up some of the wild plum stones the next time you're out there?
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Isaac
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Joined: 21 May 2007
Posts: 289
Location: Ouisconsing, Pays d'en Haut
Real Name: Isaac Walters

PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No prob on the plums... they do send up suckers... whew, I remember brushing fencelines as a kid on the farm... Yikes. Stones, I will see if I can see any plums left to grab some, if not, I will grab a bunch this summer/fall.

Isaac

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We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive.
Aldo Leopold
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