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foxriver50
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Graf ffg
grind up for pan powder
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trg11
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Joined: 26 Sep 2007
Posts: 188

Real Name: Gene Stebbins

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have had very good results with my Davis lock on my French hunting gun. The only modifications I made were cosmetic to get it to look more like the originals, it sounds like what the orhers have mentioned geometry or metalurgy. I would send the lock back or find a good ML smith to work it over, the first option would be my choice and should be a freebee, keep us posted on how you come out on this issue and the best of luck to you.
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foxriver50
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thankyou all
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Tsegoweleh
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 12:34 pm    Post subject: Flintlock Reply with quote

Oatsayo,
Seem to be doing it all correctly. perhaps try some straight 3F powder. Be sure not to use the pyrodex or fake powders. Use real Black powder.
Been thinking about it. You enlarged the vent, Getting flash... the only thing i can think of is making sure the vent and chamber are clean and perhaps try some different powder.
FLs are very persnickity. Sometimes you have to find out what they like to eat. I havent heard of the powder you stated you use, but thats not an issue. Try a different type of powder. 2 f should work but maybe try 3 f. i use 3 f in all my guns. You will get more bang for the grain with 3 f as well.
Let me know how things go.
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foxriver50
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I plan on gettin some diffrent flints and goex fffg
just need ta get the funds first.
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Tsegoweleh
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:30 am    Post subject: Flintlock Reply with quote

Oatsayo,
Drop me a line back and let me know how it goes.
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Michael Archer
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 290
Location: West of Fort Pitt
Real Name: Curt Schmidt

PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How d' ye!

Ah, it would be so much easier if we could have the gun in our hands...

;) :)

"Michael, the lock will spark, Just not evry time. seems the flint wears fast?"

IMHO...

If you are dulling a properly knapped flint in 2-3 strikes, and the lock showers sparks the first or second time, but then falls off extremely quickly-

An overly hardened frizzen or a frizzen that has been worn through its outer hardness shell should not consistently start out strong and then fade off, and then repeat with the sharpening/knapping of the flint.

It "sounds" like something is dulling the flint too fast- Then I would suspect either, a combination of excess mainspring and/or frizzen spring tension/release (and/or cock to frizzen geometry) because there is improvement with a sharp flint, there is a shower of sparks with a sharp flint, and there is consistent ignition WHEN there is a shower of sparks and the pan priming fires.

Michael Archer
Who has had some cast bear trap strength mainspring and frizzen springs

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Michael Archer
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Rewardink. wery, wery, wery rewardink.
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Tsegoweleh
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oatsayo,
I agree totally with Mr. Archer. Seems we are talking about a couple different problems.


If you are dulling a properly knapped flint in 2-3 strikes, and the lock showers sparks the first or second time, but then falls off extremely quickly-
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foxriver50
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is there any good way to diegnose the problems if its frezzin hardness or spring/s?
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Tsegoweleh
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 1:20 am    Post subject: Flintlock Reply with quote

Oatsayo,
If its sparking the hardness is probably fine. Could be too strong a spring. It should open and close smoothy with a snap. But that can be kind of subjective. If you havent experienced a well tuned lock you donthave anything to compair to.
Eating flints can be geometry of the lock, but Davis should be OK.
Just too hard to say on the computer.

Try the powder change for your ignition problem. Prehaps get with some other shooters in your area to see how your spring compairs. Worst case send it for tuning to Davis. Im sure they will make it right.
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twobirds
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Joined: 05 Jun 2007
Posts: 50
Location: East Texas
Real Name: Richard Cole

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more thing to check if you haven't already done it...

Pull the lock out of the gun, cock it, and (carefully) trip the sear. If the lock sparks well out of the gun, but not once it is re-installed in the gun, check the inletting for signs that internal parts are rubbing.

I had this problem with a flint pistol. The internals rubbed just enough to slow down the hammer fall. Once I figured out what was going on, a few minutes with an inletting chisel took care of the problem.

twobirds

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Rich Pierce
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 218
Location: St. Louis, MO
Real Name: Richard Pierce

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Archer did a good differential diagnosis.
1) The lock sparks with a new flint. That means the frizzen hardness is OK. Not necessarily perfect, but OK.
2) It's eating flints. A) Lock geometry is one possible cause, that the lock is a "basher" and not a "slicer". Look at the angle of attack if the flint to frizzen. Try bevel up on any basher lock. It improves the angle of attack of the flint. B) A slightly soft frizzen will eat flints because the flint "sticks in" instead of slicing. Check to see if the frizzen is gouging badly with a few shots. C) A flint not firmly anchored in the jaws will get used up faster. Check to see if you can easily twist the flint in the jaws.

I am sure you know the basics but I'll offer some:
Always mount the flint so that it will strike the frizzen 2/3 to at most 3/4 of the way up from the bottom of the frizzen. Make adjustments as needed if bevel up or bevel down. Do not trust the adage that the flint should just about touch the frizzen at half cock. That's hooey and just depends on how the tumbler notches are cut. Use a piece of folded leather thick enough to deform some if the flint is "peaked" but supple and thin enough to easily fold at the rear of the jaws. Whenever possible anchor the rear of the flint back at the jaw screw. If it is short, put a piece of matchstick or something behind the flint so it has support against the top jaw screw so you can get it extended the right amount. Check the angle of the flint when mounting it against the frizzen and make sure it hits square on. Tighten the dickens out of it and re-check it is square. If the flint is narrow, run it in the center of the jaws. If it is wide, run it to the outside of the jaws so the flint will not strike the barrel. When you have it mounted square to the frizzen and so it will strike 2/3 or slightly more above the base of the frizzen, snap the lock in your unloaded gun 2x. Look for sparks and double check to see that the flint did not chip or get loose.

Now you should get 10-15 shots with lots and lots of sparks with most any lock and flint. When you have your gun emptied after 10-15 shots, dry fire once and see how things are going. Make adjustments as needed. This may involve flaking to sharpen the flint (some call it knapping the edge), flipping it so it is bevel down after some wear, or moving it forward in the jaws and placing support behind it. Go back to the steps outlined above after adjustment: tighten the dickens out of it, check to see it is square, and dry fire it 2x to see it is sparking. Go shoot another 10-15 times or until you experience ignition problems.
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Steve Stanley
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Joined: 16 May 2007
Posts: 44
Location: Somewhere between 21st century England & 18th century Acadia...........
Real Name: Steve Stanley

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds like exactly the same problems I've had with my loyalist arms dog-lock.....It does appear,(in my case) to be the surplus T-34 springs they've used.......
Steve
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Morgan
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 184
Location: Arkansas
Real Name: Morgan Hodkin

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just one more thing for you to try before you start doing any major modifications. If you are using leather as your flint pad, try taking one of your round balls, pound it flat and wrap your flint in that instead of leather.

I had something of the same problem with the L&R lock on my french tulle. After changing from leather to lead, not a single problem. Give it a try and see if it helps.

Morgan

_________________
"It is when people forget God that tyrants forge their chains." Patrick Henry (1736 - 1799)
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Morgan
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Joined: 15 May 2007
Posts: 184
Location: Arkansas
Real Name: Morgan Hodkin

PostPosted: Tue Sep 01, 2009 4:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One other note, I have had better luck with rich pierce's flints than with any other flint I have used, french or english.

Morgan

_________________
"It is when people forget God that tyrants forge their chains." Patrick Henry (1736 - 1799)
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