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Wooden ware

 
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kikepiawessis
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Joined: 05 Dec 2008
Posts: 13
Location: Highlands New Jersey
Real Name: Herbert F. Kaasmann

PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 6:21 pm    Post subject: Wooden ware Reply with quote

Made several items out of wood burls, ie - spoons, bowls, ladles, canoe cups and was wondering if anyone can tell me how to treat them so they can be used for eating and drinking. Specifically what NA would have used for exterior stain, if any and what to treat the inside with. I have seen reference made to mineral oil. what would be safe and since they are wood --prevent bacterial growth, that is aside from cleaning them after each use--which brings up another question --what or how should they be cleaned-Soap? or just like dutch ovens just scrubbing with hot water
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skunkkiller
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Joined: 14 Jan 2008
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Location: monroe 53566City or ZIP/Postal Code
Real Name: duane stanke

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

linseedoil or what I do is rub it with veggie oil and repete as nesaraery.

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raymond the younger
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

do like the dutch oven, a brush or rag and super hot water. I put olive oil on my wood items inside and out after a outing. treat them with the oil when you put them up for winter.
raymond
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freedom475
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Joined: 05 Dec 2008
Posts: 24
Location: Rocky Mountains of Montana
Real Name: Wes Daems

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peanut oil is one of the best oils to use for your wood kitchen stuff.

Wood has natural enzymes in it that inhibit bacterial growth, This is why a wood cutting board is better than a plastic one.

The only way to totally sterilize the micro scratches in a platic board is bleach; No boiling water won't do it unless you can boil the whole board for a period of time(time depends on what you are trying to kill)...Not nessasary with wood.

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pichou
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a topic about treating woodenware in the main forum.

If your stuff is new you can mix whatever oil you use with non-toxic pigment like iron oxide to color the outside. Once the pores have old oil inside, the wood will not take this kind of stain.
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ccollins
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Thu Jan 22, 2009 10:25 am    Post subject: woodenware Reply with quote

Here in the New York area one method of staining wooden burls is by using the bark and or roots of the Hemlock tree. Boil bark/roots in water until the desired dark color is acquired and then place in item to be stained. Once item is placed in the mixture should be a slow simmer rather than boil. Grease is used to shine over time, I use venison tallow. Some of the ladles ares so dark and polished they appear to be horn, but are wood.

Chris
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Turning Bear
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I use olive oil in season and mineral oil to store... But I saw a great presentation at the Pequot museum in Connecticut...a movie that featured a Penobscot elder making burned burl bowls...he used bear grease/tallow as the sealer. He also used a beavers tooth to help shave out the inside and river clay to control the burn.
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ccollins
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2009 11:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I often wonder how well the beaver teeth work, I suppose they necessarily do not have to stay sharp due to the soft nature of the wood after it is burned. Were the teeth mounted in anything or just simply held with his fingers?

Chris
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Turning Bear
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Real Name: Anonymous

PostPosted: Wed Feb 11, 2009 7:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

He wrapped the beaver tooth with some braintan too get a better grip, but didn't mount it permanently
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